Posts Tagged ‘immigration’

‘Invisible’ crime: Immigrant scams are big business in South Florida, but few crooks caught

Tuesday, June 6th, 2017

By Joseph A. Mann Jr.
FloridaBulldog.org
Infamous as the setting for many cases of high-profile financial fraud and chicanery, South Florida is also home to a relatively unknown scam that targets the region’s large immigrant population, bilking many of them for thousands of dollars for “expert” immigration services that are never delivered, a Florida Bulldog investigation has found.
The post ‘Invisible’ crime: Immigrant scams are big business in South Florida, but few crooks caught appeared first on Florida Bulldog.

Vote on this story -->>>

Greg Steube files illegal immigration criminalization measure

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

Anyone ordered out of the country and later found in Florida could be charged with a crime under legislation filed Wednesday in the Florida Senate.
The bill (SB 1358), sponsored by Sarasota Republican Greg Steube, would create a third-degree felony, punishable by up to five years in state prison.
The proposal would apply to anyone who “is denied admission to, is excluded, deported, or removed from, or who departs the United States while an order of exclusion, deportation, or removal is outstanding and thereafter enters or is at any time found in the state.”
It creates an exception for those who can show that the federal government “consents to his or her admission or the person can establish that federal law does not require advance consent,” the bill says.
A voicemail seeking comment from Steube was left Wednesday.
Now, being in the country unlawfully is not a crime under federal law unless someone is deported and then returns without authorization, said Mark Schlakman, senior program director with the Florida State University Center for the Advancement of Human Rights.
Questions of its constitutionality aside, he said, its “practical implication … would disproportionately burden Florida taxpayers for what would otherwise be a federal responsibility,” he said.
Stuebe, a former House member and first-term senator, already has filed a number of controversial bills for the 2017 Legislative Session, including gun- and public records-related measures.
He also filed a bill (SB 82) that would undo a 2014 state law granting in-state tuition to undocumented immigrant students, known as DREAMers. It stands for Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors, federal legislation that has not been passed.
DREAMers are children who entered the U.S. illegally but allowed to stay under an Obama administration initiative called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA).
The post Greg Steube files illegal immigration criminalization measure appeared first on Florida Politics.

Vote on this story -->>>

George W. Bush on Donald Trump and Russia: ‘We all need answers’

Monday, February 27th, 2017

Former President George W. Bush said Monday “we all need answers” on the extent of contact between President Donald Trump‘s team and the Russian government, and didn’t rule out the idea that a special prosecutor could be necessary to lead an investigation.
The Republican also defended the media’s role in keeping world leaders in check, noting that “power can be addictive,” and warned against immigration policies that could alienate Muslims.
“I am for an immigration policy that’s welcoming and upholds the law,” Bush told NBC’s “Today” show.
Bush’s comments came after a prominent Republican in Congress, Rep. Darrell Issa of California, called for a special prosecutor to investigate whether Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election and was in touch with Trump’s top advisers during the campaign.
Bush said he would trust Senate Intelligence panel Chairman Richard Burr to decide if a special prosecutor is necessary.
But, Bush added, “I think we all need answers … I’m not sure the right avenue to take. I am sure, though, that that question needs to be answered.”
The former president, who is promoting a book of his paintings of wounded veterans, also took issue with Trump’s characterization of the media as an “enemy of the people.” Bush said the U.S. won’t be able to convince authoritarian governments, including Russia, to open up their governments to media scrutiny if U.S. leaders try to discredit their own press.
“We need an independent media to hold people like me to account,” Bush said. “Power can be very addictive, and it can be corrosive. And it’s important for the media to call to account people who abuse their power, whether it be here or elsewhere.”
On the issue of immigration and Trump’s recent attempt to ban travelers from seven Muslim-majority nations, Bush warned that if the U.S. freezes out other countries and turns inward,

Vote on this story -->>>

Jeff Sessions: U.S. to continue use of privately run prisons

Thursday, February 23rd, 2017

Attorney General Jeff Sessions signaled Thursday his strong support for the federal government’s continued use of private prisons, reversing an Obama administration directive to phase out their use. Stocks of major private prison companies rose at the news.
Sessions issued a memo replacing one issued last August by Sally Yates, the deputy attorney general at the time. That memo directed the federal Bureau of Prisons to begin reducing and ultimately end its reliance on privately run prisons.
It followed a Justice Department audit that said private facilities have more safety and security problems than government-run ones. Yates, in her announcement, said they were less necessary given declines in the overall federal prison population.
But Sessions, in his memo, said Yates’ directive went against longstanding Justice Department policy and practice and “impaired the Bureau’s ability to meet the future needs of the federal correctional system.” He said he was directing the BOP to “return to its previous approach.”
The federal prison population — now just under 190,000 — has been dropping due in part to changes in federal sentencing policies over the past three years. Private prisons hold about 22,100 of these inmates, or 12 percent of the total population, the Justice Department has said.
The federal government started to rely on private prisons in the late 1990s because of overcrowding. Many of the federal prison inmates in private facilities are foreign nationals who are being held on immigration offenses. The Yates policy did not extend to prisons used by Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which hold tens of thousands of immigrants awaiting deportation.
Immigration and human rights advocates have long complained about conditions in privately run prisons. An inspector general audit from last August said problems at private prisons in recent years included property damage, injuries and the death of a corrections officer.
Republished with permission of The

Vote on this story -->>>

Donald Trump’s options for restoring travel ban

Saturday, February 11th, 2017

President Donald Trump has promised more legal action after a federal appeals court refused to reinstate his ban on travelers from seven predominantly Muslim nations. Trump tweeted “SEE YOU IN COURT” after the decision came out Thursday, but what he has in mind remains to be seen.
Trump said Friday that he has “no doubt” he will win the case in court and told reporters he’s considering signing a “brand-new order” on immigration.
The 3-0 ruling means that refugees and people from the seven nations — Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen — can continue entering the United States for now. The administration has several options on how to proceed.
A look at where the legal fight goes from here.
REHEARING AT THE APPEALS COURT

The Trump administration could decide to ask the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reconsider the three-judge panel’s ruling. But the odds of success seem low, said Margo Schlanger, a law professor at the University of Michigan. She noted that the three-judge panel was unanimous and included a judge chosen by a Republican president.
SUPREME COURT APPEAL
The government could file an emergency appeal to the Supreme Court and ask the justices to restore the ban. But it would take at least five justices to overturn the ruling from the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, and that may be a long shot. The high court still has only eight members since the death of Justice Antonin Scalia — four conservative and four liberal justices.
“There are almost surely four votes to deny an emergency request to reinstate the order,” said Peter Spiro, a law professor at Temple University.
The last immigration case to reach the justices ended in a 4-4 deadlock last year. That suggests a similar split over Trump’s order, which would let the 9th Circuit ruling stand and

Vote on this story -->>>

Fed lawyers deciding next step in Donald Trump travel ban fight

Friday, February 10th, 2017

Government lawyers fighting to defend President Donald Trump‘s executive order on immigration said Friday that “all options” are being considered after a federal appeals court ruled against the president’s ban on travelers from seven predominantly Muslim nations.
A Justice Department lawyer who spoke at a hearing in Virginia said the administration was weighing whether to challenge a 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling that upheld a temporary block on Trump’s ban, saying it was unlikely to survive a legal challenge.
“We may appeal. We may not,” attorney Erez Reuveni said. “All options are being considered.”
It could appeal the restraining order on Trump’s travel ban to the U.S. Supreme Court or it could attempt to remake the case in the district court.
Reuveni was appearing at a hearing before Judge Leonie Brinkema at which the state of Virginia was challenging the ban. The judge did not rule. She noted that “the status quo remains” because of the 9th circuit’s decision and suggested that a well-reasoned ruling would take time and could not be written “overnight.”
Michael Kelly, a spokesman for Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring, said Friday’s hearing in a federal court in a Washington, D.C., suburb posed the most significant state challenge yet to Trump’s order. In a statement, he said it “will be the most in-depth examination of the merits of the arguments against the ban.”
Lawyers for Herring, a Democrat, are asking the judge for a preliminary injunction barring the Trump administration from enforcing that portion of the Jan. 27 executive order that bars anyone from those countries — Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen — from entering the U.S. for 90 days. The state is not challenging that portion of Trump’s order suspending entry of refugees for four months.
“If the Commonwealth is successful in securing a preliminary injunction, it

Vote on this story -->>>

Report cites Orlando, Miami, for having large undocumented immigrant populations

Friday, February 10th, 2017

Miami and Orlando are among the biggest homes in the United States to unauthorized immigrants, according to a new report from the Pew Research Center.
The report, base on 2014 data analyzed by Pew, estimates that there are 450,000 undocumented immigrants in the Miami-megaplex that includes Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach, ranking the metro area as the fifth largest, behind New York, Los Angeles, Houston and Dallas, but ahead of Chicago and Washington D.C.
In the Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford metropolitan area, the report estimates 110,000 unauthorized immigrants, ranking 19th nationally. The Orlando is the nation’s 25th largest metro area.
Pew reports that its analysis shows that the nation’s unauthorized immigrant population is highly concentrated, more so than the U.S. population overall. In 2014, the 20 metro areas with most unauthorized immigrants were home to 6.8 million of them, or 61 percent of the estimated nationwide total. By contrast, only 36 percent of the total U.S. population lived in those metro areas.
The analysis also shows that unauthorized immigrants tend to live where other immigrants live. Among lawful immigrants – including naturalized citizens and noncitizens – 65 percentage lived in those top metros. But not all major metropolitan areas house major populations of unauthorized immigrants.
The Tampa-St Petersburg-Clearwater metro area has about 75,000; Cape Coral-Fort Myers, 35,000; Naples, 30,000; and Jacksonville, Sarasota-Bradenton, and Lakeland-Winter Haven about 20,000 each, according to the Pew report.
The post Report cites Orlando, Miami, for having large undocumented immigrant populations appeared first on Florida Politics.

Vote on this story -->>>

Donald Trump nominee decried criticism of judges, senators agree

Thursday, February 9th, 2017

President Donald Trump insisted Thursday that comments by his Supreme Court nominee criticizing his own attacks on the judiciary were “misrepresented,” even as Republican and Democratic lawmakers vouched for the veracity of the remarks.
Trump responded after private rebukes from Judge Neil Gorsuch, who said in meetings with lawmakers on Wednesday that the president’s comments about federal judges were “disheartening.”
Gorsuch, who was nominated by Trump last week to the nation’s highest court, made the comments in meetings with senators after Trump accused an appeals court panel considering his immigration and refugee executive order of being “so political.” Over the weekend, he labeled a judge who ruled on his executive order a “so-called judge” and referred to the ruling as “ridiculous.”
Democratic Sen. Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut first relayed Gorsuch’s remarks on Wednesday following a meeting with him. Trump’s own confirmation team for Gorsuch later confirmed he had made the remarks.
But Trump said during a Thursday luncheon with senators that Blumenthal had misrepresented Gorsuch. “His comments were misrepresented. And what you should do is ask Senator Blumenthal about his Vietnam record that didn’t exist after years of saying it did,” he said.
Blumenthal, who served in the Marine Corps Reserves during Vietnam, apologized in 2010 for saying he had served in Vietnam.
The president made the comments while making the case for Gorsuch during a luncheon with 10 senators, including six of Blumenthal’s fellow Democrats.
Blumenthal, a former state attorney general, argued Thursday that Gorsuch would need to go further to publicly denounce Trump’s verbal assault on judicial independence.
“He needs to condemn Donald Trump’s attacks publicly and it needs to be much stronger, more explicit and direct than has been done so far,” Blumenthal said. “Unless it is done publicly in a clear condemnation, it will not establish his independence.”
Lawmakers from both parties quickly vouched for

Vote on this story -->>>

Activists: Charities must move galas from Donald Trump’s Mar-a-Lago

Sunday, February 5th, 2017

Since President Donald Trump opened the gold-infused ballroom at his Mar-a-Lago resort almost 12 years ago, it has been a popular rental for the American Red Cross, hospitals, medical researchers and other charities for fundraising galas where the wealthiest donors are wined and dined, often netting $1 million or more.
But Trump’s election puts charities in an awkward position over choosing the resort — recently dubbed the president’s Winter White House — for events they may have planned more than a year in advance.
With Trump placing a moratorium on refugees and immigrants from seven Muslim-majority countries and his promises to dismantle the Affordable Care Act, activists are pressuring charities such as the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Cleveland Clinic to move or cancel their galas this month.
As the International Red Cross held a gala fundraiser Saturday at Mar-a-Lago, about three thousand demonstrators marched nearby to protest Trump’s now-blocked executive order temporarily limiting immigration. The event ended peacefully, and there were no arrests.
So far, no known Mar-a-Lago charity events have been moved or canceled.
More than 2,000 people, including faculty and students from Harvard Medical School, have signed an online petition demanding that Boston-based Dana-Farber move or cancel its Feb. 18 “Discovery Celebration,” featuring a performance by Grammy Award winner David Foster. The cheapest ticket is $1,250.
Petition organizer George Karandinos, a 30-year-old Harvard medical student from Houston, said he understands that canceling or moving the Dana-Farber event would be difficult, “but they can make a public moral stand that is in line with their stated values” of diversity and supporting scientific exchanges across borders. Plus, he said, a cancellation might attract additional donors.
A similar open letter, signed by more than 1,100 including doctors and medical students, demands that Cleveland Clinic move its Feb. 25 “Reflections of Versailles: A Night in the Hall of

Vote on this story -->>>

Federal government seeks stay of immigration order

Saturday, February 4th, 2017

The Latest on a lawsuit by Washington and Minnesota seeking to halt President Donald Trump’s immigration ban (all times local):
7: 20 p.m.
The White House says it will seek an emergency stay of a federal judge’s order that temporarily blocked President Donald Trump’s ban on people from seven predominantly Muslim countries.
White House spokesman Sean Spicer said Trump’s executive order issued last week was “lawful and appropriate.” An initial statement said the judge’s order was “outrageous,” but it was later revised to remove that word.
U.S. District Judge James Robart late Friday granted a temporary restraining order at the request of Washington state and Minnesota that’s effective nationwide.
Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson had said that Trump’s order is causing significant harm to residents and effectively mandates discrimination. Minnesota joined the suit this week.
___
5:49 p.m.
Minnesota Attorney General Lori Swanson says she supports measures to protect the security of the United States but also backs the Constitution.
Swanson, a member of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party, is reacting to a federal court ruling temporarily blocking President Donald Trump’s travel ban.
She said in a statement Friday that she supports “strong measures to protect the security of the United States” but also supports “the bedrock of that security — namely, the Constitution of the United States.”
U.S. District Judge James Robart granted a temporary restraining order Friday that Washington state and Minnesota requested. It halts Trump’s executive order banning travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program.
___
4:35 p.m.
Washington state’s attorney general says a federal court ruling temporarily blocking President Donald Trump’s travel ban shows nobody is above the law.
U.S. District Judge James Robart granted a temporary restraining order Friday that Washington state and Minnesota requested. It halts Trump’s executive order banning travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries and suspending the U.S. refugee program.
Washington Attorney General Bob

Vote on this story -->>>

Amid Donald Trump’s shake-up, many wondering ‘what’s coming next’

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

Days into an administration that promised to govern by upheaval, Donald Trump‘s White House has been the target of massive protests, defied reporters who questioned fact-challenged statements and issued a blur of lightning-rod executive actions. The speed and depth of it all have left many Americans apprehensive: Even some who longed for a shake-up are unsettled by a sense of chaos it has unleashed.
“We’re in a very fragile state right now,” said Margaret Johnson of Germantown, Maryland, who runs a small translation business. “We don’t know what’s coming next. The country’s divided. There’s a lot of fear. And I think we’re kind of at that point where things can go any kind of way, and it’s really hard to say which way they’re going to go.”
That uncertainty finds an echo in Pastor Mike Bergman‘s church in Adrian, Missouri, 40 miles south of Kansas City, where many congregants count themselves as conservatives and embrace the new administration’s order cutting off funding to international groups that provide abortions. But as church members consider another order — restricting refugees and pausing entry to the U.S. from several Muslim-majority countries — worries about security are tempered by concern about the needs of refugees and whether Trump’s rhetoric is widening the gulf between Americans, Bergman said.
“There is worry about how deep the divide is going to run. There is worry about some of the political rhetoric … about how all that is going to cause the divide in the community to deepen and more bitterness to spring up between the people of our country. I wouldn’t say we’re really optimistic right now,” he said.
Trump is hardly the first president to take office promising wholesale change in the face of substantial skepticism. But Kevin Boyle, a professor of American history at Northwestern University, said the new

Vote on this story -->>>

New Florida Chamber poll finds jobs remain top concern for Florida voters

Monday, December 19th, 2016

The No. 1 issue facing Florida continues to be jobs, according to a new Florida Chamber of Commerce survey.
The Florida Chamber Political Institute released a new statewide survey Monday aimed at “checking the political pulse of Floridians on how they feel about elected officials as well as the issue impacting them.”
Jobs and the economy remain a big issue for Floridians, with 19 percent of respondents saying it was a top concern. The survey found 10 percent of Floridians said healthcare and the Affordable Care Act were a top concern, while 9 percent said education was a big issue facing Florida.
About 20 percent of men said jobs and the economy were the most important issue, compared to 17 percent of women polled. Ten percent of men said education was important, compared to 9 percent of women. About 11 percent of women said healthcare was a top issue, compared to 8 percent of men.
Floridians continue to be concerned about global warming and immigration, with 8 percent choosing global warming. Seven percent picked immigration, according to an analysis by Marian Johnson, the executive director of the Florida Chamber Political Institute.
More than half (52 percent) of Floridians said they believe the state is heading in the right direction, while 27 percent believe things are heading in the wrong direction.
“Voters are more optimistic than they have been,” wrote Johnson. “In fact, for the first time since the Great Recession began in 2007, the Florida Chamber Political Institute poll shows more than 50 percent of Floridians are more optimistic about Florida’s direction.”
And that appears to bode well for Gov. Rick Scott. According to the Chamber analysis, Scott’s favorability ratings “are more positive than negative as voters have a positive outlook on the state.” The survey found 44 percent of voters have a favorable opinion of Scott,

Vote on this story -->>>

Rob Jesmer: Florida plays large role in fixing broken immigration system

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

Rob Jesmer
In this tense period in both national and international relations, we’re confronted with a number of important security issues, all in need of their own respective solutions.
One of the issues that seem to be most prevalent is the need for immigration reform.
Countless political leaders have laid out ideas for solving this problem, yet in the midst of a tumultuous election cycle, it’s easy to replace a sense of resolve to fix these issues with heated rhetoric.
I had the pleasure to recently serve on a panel of speakers at the Kemp Forum on “The Future of Immigrants and America.” This panel was a public discussion on U.S. immigration reform featuring leading conservatives from diverse professional fields who were focused on examining the impact of immigration on security, the workforce, our economy and culture.
The key takeaway: immigration is an acute national security issue, and Congress should act immediately to both secure the border and create a way for those living here illegally to get right with the law.
Through a tightly regulated process consisting of background checks, the payment of back taxes, and an extended waiting period, a pathway to citizenship would allow those that are undocumented to come out of the shadows and become productive members of society.
To be clear, this would not be blanket amnesty, and necessary steps would have to be taken before citizenship was granted, but this is the consensus type of legislation we must be focused on as 80 percent of Americans support this reform.
Today, whether you’re an immigrant or a native-born American, our immigration system is failing you. Yes, we need a strong border, and we need to continue the steps that the Department of Homeland Security has taken to secure our southern border.
In the last 10 years, the Border Patrol has almost doubled the number

Vote on this story -->>>

Patrick Murphy listens to DREAMers’ stories, pitches immigration stance at Orlando roundtable

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

At the Cafe Coabana, a crew of Young DREAMers got to sit down with U.S. Senate hopeful Patrick Murphy Monday morning for a roundtable event in which they told him some of their stories.
For close to an hour, Murphy listened to their tales of trouble and hardship — some came from Puerto Rico, others from Mexico and still others were firstborn U.S. citizens from immigrant parents. They listed some of their concerns: the often-low wages undocumented immigrants make, the threat of being deported and the lack of health care.
Their demands were simple — reform the immigration system, stop deportations and make it easier to become a citizen. Murphy listened intently to them and addressed them at the event’s conclusion.
“Immigration reform is not just an abstract policy idea or a partisan political issue,” Murphy said. “This is about allowing our neighbors and friends, Floridians who contribute to the diversity and strength of our state, to come out of the shadows. It’s about keeping Florida families together and letting DREAMers go to college, contribute to the economy, and even serve overseas. I will stand with these passionate advocates and fight to fix this broken system.”
He also hit his opponent, Marco Rubio, for “flip-flopping” on the issue of immigration. Rubio, Murphy said, had initially said he was all for reforming immigration, but once he ran for President, he changed his stance and became very harsh on it.
Also, Rubio’s endorsement of Donald Trump showed Murphy that Rubio didn’t have the best interests of immigrants in mind.
One DREAMer, Jessica Guevara, age 15, said her father was currently involved in an immigration court case that could eventually see him deported. Though she is a U.S.-born citizen, she could be forced to go with him because her mother is out of work, too, and she is a

Vote on this story -->>>

Patrick Murphy listens to DREAMers’ stories, pitches immigration stance at Orlando roundtable

Monday, October 3rd, 2016

At the Cafe Coabana, a crew of Young DREAMers got to sit down with U.S. Senate hopeful Patrick Murphy Monday morning for a roundtable event in which they told him some of their stories.
For close to an hour, Murphy listened to their tales of trouble and hardship — some came from Puerto Rico, others from Mexico and still others were firstborn U.S. citizens from immigrant parents. They listed some of their concerns: the often-low wages undocumented immigrants make, the threat of being deported and the lack of health care.
Their demands were simple — reform the immigration system, stop deportations and make it easier to become a citizen. Murphy listened intently to them and addressed them at the event’s conclusion.
“Immigration reform is not just an abstract policy idea or a partisan political issue,” Murphy said. “This is about allowing our neighbors and friends, Floridians who contribute to the diversity and strength of our state, to come out of the shadows. It’s about keeping Florida families together and letting DREAMers go to college, contribute to the economy, and even serve overseas. I will stand with these passionate advocates and fight to fix this broken system.”
He also hit his opponent, Marco Rubio, for “flip-flopping” on the issue of immigration. Rubio, Murphy said, had initially said he was all for reforming immigration, but once he ran for President, he changed his stance and became very harsh on it.
Also, Rubio’s endorsement of Donald Trump showed Murphy that Rubio didn’t have the best interests of immigrants in mind.
One DREAMer, Jessica Guevara, age 15, said her father was currently involved in an immigration court case that could eventually see him deported. Though she is a U.S.-born citizen, she could be forced to go with him because her mother is out of work, too, and she is a

Vote on this story -->>>

AutoNation chair Mike Jackson lashes out against anti-immigration, anti-trade positions

Friday, September 30th, 2016

The chairman and president of the nation’s largest car dealer company, Mike Jackson of AutoNation, blasted Donald Trump and others who rail against immigrants and international trade deals, during a keynote address to the Florida Chamber of Commerce.
In his speech Thursday night to the chamber’s Future of Florida Forum Leadership Dinner in Orlando, Jackson outlined four things he called the four flat tires in the American economy. And besides over-regulation and complex, too-high taxes, he said the nation’s refusal to pursue deals to open international trade, and its anti-immigration fervor are having profound effects slowing the economy.
Jackson, whose Fort Lauderdale company is the nation’s largest automotive retailer with dealerships in 15 states, said he is so upset that the anti-immigration and anti-trade deal positions have taken favor in the Republican Party that he recently quit the party to become an independent, and said he cannot support Trump.
“The Republican Party at the moment is unrecognizable from anything I’ve ever known,” Jackson said.
He was equally critical of Democrats, saying they are moving toward European-style socialism “at breakneck speed.” But said he would be supporting Democrat Hillary Clinton because he’s convinced she has less potential to do major damage.
He brought the house down by declaring, and illustrating with a cartoon, that Trump, in his view, is the “billionaire Archie Bunker” from the TV show “All In The Family,” while Clinton is the diabolically “cunning Claire Underwood” from “House Of Cards.”
But Jackson’s speech focused most passionately on the two issues he said are being misunderstood, the nation’s need to embrace immigrants, even those who came in illegally; and the nation’s need to greatly expand its trade deals worldwide.
Immigrants, he said, risk all to come to America and bring daring entrepreneurial spirits, as evidenced by a fact he cited — 40 percent of Fortune 500 companies were founded by

Vote on this story -->>>

Tim Bryce: Has Howard Beale’s moment finally arrived?

Thursday, August 20th, 2015

If Donald Trump contributed anything to the political process during this presidential election, he has called the American voter to arms over our dysfunctional government. People are mad as hell about such things as:

Lack of confidence in the economy and GDP;
Unemployment, part-time jobs, and sending jobs overseas;
Illegal immigration;
Declining morality;
Disrespect for law and order;
Political correctness;
Our Middle East policies;
Energy dependence;
An overbearing health care system;
Our general lack of leadership in the world;
Politicians more imbued with self-interests as opposed to their constituents;
And much more.

Week after week, the Rasmussen Polls tell us we believe the country is headed in the wrong direction. Congressional approval ratings are incredibly low, and the president’s ratings haven’t been above 50 percent since 2012.
Voters are now expected to accept subservience to a bureaucratic government, a redistribution of wealth, to feel guilty about our religious faith, race and sexual orientation, and burdened by oppressive laws and social mores. We now believe we no longer live in the same country we lived in just six short years ago and we’re changing much too fast. It seems what is right is wrong, and what is wrong is right.
Our angst has gone well beyond being just irritated or perturbed, and blossomed into full anger. The fact Trump’s campaign, someone not from the political world, rocketed to first place is indicative of the anger and mistrust of our politicians. It’s beyond exasperating; it’s transforming.
Unlike the Civil War, which contested states rights versus federal, we now are faced with a reformation of the fundamental American way of life, and people don’t like it. The voters believe politicians are bought and sold to the highest bidder, and as such, no longer represent the best interests of the people. It should come as no surprise, they feel abused and taken for granted by politicians.
Americans are now at a

Vote on this story -->>>

THE MIAMI METROPOLIS -your source for news, music, sports, movies, restaurants, reviews, weather, travel, arts, tech and events in Miami