Posts Tagged ‘Iowa’

Arizona Man Sues Prosecutor for Wrongful Arrest that Kept him in Jail for Two Months

Friday, January 5th, 2018

Imagine spending two months in jail for a robbery that you didn’t commit. Well, that is exactly what happened to an Iowa man after he was falsely charged with first-degree robbery.
Now he is suing the prosecutor that threw him in jail.
Joseph McBride, 23, was arrested for his assumed role in a January 2017 home invasion robbery in Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
McBride was in Phoenix at the time of his August 2017 arrest, several months after the original crime was committed.
And he showed authorities a time-stamped cell phone selfie proving he was in Arizona at the time of the Iowa home invasion, but they remained steadfast that they had the right guy.
MeBride is from Cedar Rapids but he moved to Phoenix in November 2015.
He was one of three people arrested for the crime.
Linn County Attorney Jerry Vander Sanden is the prosecutor that brought charges on McBride. Sanden alleged in court documents that social media posts and phone records suggested that McBride was involved in the home invasion robbery.
Sanden says the charge was based on a, “good-faith belief that the victim was correct in the identification.”
But as it turns out, the only evidence Sanden and police relied on was the victim pointing to a facebook photo of McBride, claiming he was involved in the crime.
The victim, identified as 27-year-old Tristan Hermann, told police that an acquaintance he knew as Elizabeth came to his apartment. Two men then forced their way in Hermann’s apartment, beating him with a handgun, and stealing his money and cellphone.
Hermann identified the woman as 22-year-old Elizabeth Navarro and said she set him up.
Hermann, who is bipolar, told police days later that he “had done his own investigation” and concluded the men involved were Navarro’s boyfriend, Austin Foster, and a man with the Facebook name “Jody Holliday.”
Police used photos and

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WATCH: Iowa Cop Leaves Man Paralyzed During Traffic Stop

Saturday, December 10th, 2016

After being shot three times by an Iowa cop during a traffic stop on November 1, Jerime Mitchell is now paralyzed from the neck down.
Linn County Attorney Jerry Vander Sanden announced this week that no charges will be filed against the shooting officer after a grand jury declined to return an indictment against Cedar Rapids police officer Lucas Jones.
However, the grand jury arrived at that decision without obtaining statements from Mitchell, even though his lawyer insists she tried for several weeks to set up an interview with investigators and her client.
The grand jury also arrived at that decision without hearing a recorded conversation between Jones and Mitchell during the traffic stop because the officer’s body-worn microphone was not recording.
Vander Sanden said it is likely the microphone’s rechargeable battery had died because the charge only lasts four hours and the officer was four hours and 15 minutes into his shift, according to The Gazette.
So the grand jury had only a dash cam video to based its decision on.
However, Vander Sanden said he will not file charges against Mitchell even though police found a pound of marijuana, digital scales and $1,500 in cash in his truck because it would not “serve any purpose of justice” considering he is already paralyzed.
The video  shows Jones pulling over Mitchell on November 1 at 1 a.m. because Mitchell’s license plate lights were not working. Jones exits his K-9 patrol vehicle and approaches Mitchell’s vehicle.
Words are exchanged but the dash cam video does not capture them and the officers’ s microphone was not working.
Jones then gestures for Mitchell to exit the vehicle. As Mitchell exits, Jones attempts to place his hands behind his back, but Mitchell resists and an all-out brawl ensues.
During the struggle, Jones remotely opens his doors to allow his police dog to attack Mitchell. The police dog

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Lawsuit Filed Against Iowa Cop who Mistakenly Shot Mother of Three Aiming for Family Dog

Wednesday, November 23rd, 2016

The family of an Iowa woman who was fatally shot by a cop trying to kill her family’s dog filed a lawsuit last week.
Autumn Steele, 34, was shot by Burlington cop Jesse Hill on January 6, 2015 as her 3-year-old son stood next to her.
Autumn Steele, 34, died after she was accidentally shot by Burlington cop Jesse Hill, who was trying to shoot her dog.
Hill responded to a domestic disturbance call at the Steel’s residence and discovered the couple having a verbal disagreement.
He began shooting at the Steele’s German Shepard “Sammy” after the dog allegedly bit him. But instead of shooting the dog, officer Hill ended up slipping in the snow and shooting Autumn Steele in the chest.
“As Hill was firing the first shot, he lost his balance and fell backwards but continued to discharge his service weapon,” the lawsuit states.
No criminal charges were filed against Burlington cop Jesse Hill after he tried to kill a dog during a domestic disturbance call, but slipped and shot 34-year-old mother Autumn Steele instead.
Autumn’s Steele’s husband, Gabriel, along with Gina Colbert, her mother, filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Iowa last week alleging wrongful death and excessive force.
It asks for unspecified damages and claims Burlington cop Jesse Hill fired his gun in an “unreasonable, unnecessary, and reckless manner” striking and killing Autumn Steele in her front yard and that the Burlington Police Department failed to properly train Hill or properly supervise the officer in the use of deadly force.
Burlington police have steadfastly refused to release full footage from officer  Hill’s body and dash cam, as well as 911 calls made prior to the shooting.
In October, the Iowa Public Information Board voted 5-3 to file charges against the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation and the Burlington Police Department for violating Iowa’s open records requests laws by denying records and footage involving the 2015 shooting of Autumn Steele.
In April, Burlington police released

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Iowa Cop Killer Accused Black Teens of Being “Cop Haters” for not Standing for National Anthem

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2016

It was only last month that Scott Michael Greene accused a group of black teenagers of being “cop haters” because they did not stand for the National Anthem during a high school football game.
But Iowa police say it was only this morning that he shot and killed two cops in cold blood as they sat in their patrol cars.
Greene, 46, was arrested a few hours later after an intense manhunt, according to the New York Post.
Greene was apparently angry at police after they had kicked him out of the football game for waving a Confederate flag in front of a group of black students in Urbandale on October 14, 2016.
Two days later, he posted a video to YouTube from the encounter titled, “Police Abuse, Civil Rights Violation at Urbandale High School 10/14/16.”
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In the video, he tries to explain to the cops kicking him out that he was doing nothing more than expressing his First Amendment rights to wave the Confederate flag.
He also said he was assaulted and had his flag stolen from him.
But police said he was causing a disturbance and that he would be arrested for trespassing on school property if he did not leave. They also returned his flag to him.
While they agreed he had a Constitutional right to wave the flag, they informed him that on school grounds, he was subject to school policies that did not allow the waving of the Confederate flag.
Less than a week ago, he stated in the comments section of his video that he was “offended by the blacks sitting through our anthem” and referred to them as being “cop haters.”
But now he is a suspected cop killer.
The first cop he is accused of killing was sitting in a car

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Bob Sparks: When likability and the desire for leadership and experience collide

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

Fifteen months before the presidential election, New Hampshire and Iowa is where the action is. That is true every four years.
Winning the nomination and the general election requires a strong performance in several key states. In 2016, the next president will have won at least two of a group of three swing states that includes Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania. There is no plausible path to 270 electoral votes without two of those states.
Quinnipiac University not only took the temperature of those three states recently, they conducted a full checkup. The results give a clear picture of where the race stands now.
They show that Hillary Clinton is in serious trouble, which will only get worse if Vice President Joe Biden gets into the race. In many areas, the Democrats get their best polling results from Florida, not dependable Democratic-leaning Pennsylvania.
This poll shows people personally like Biden and Dr. Ben Carson. Biden scores well in every category, while Carson comes up short only in “experience.”
The negatives coming Donald Trump’s way show his support comes from a fraction of the Republican Party. Trump polled the highest at 28 percent against the GOP field. Among respondents, 72 percent are looking elsewhere.
Voters might agree with some, or many, of a candidate’s positions, but they want to vote for someone they like. In a close election, too many might stay at home if the nominee does not make them want to get out and vote.
In these vital states, Clinton receives double-digit majorities among voters who hold unfavorable views of her. Biden is viewed favorably by double-digit majorities with U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders earning small pluralities on the positive side.
With all that has come out recently, it is no wonder Clinton is distrusted by most respondents, while Biden earns high marks in this category while Sanders earns

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Peter Schorsch: Is it time to bet on Jeb Bush again?

Sunday, October 4th, 2015

Earlier this week, POLITICO ran “5 Reasons to Bet $5 on Marco Rubio” and tried to make the case for a path to the presidency for Florida’s talented junior senator.
Rubio has had very good showings in the first two debates — the same in which Jeb Bush had performed at what charitably might be called a workmanlike level. And Bush, the self-described tortoise in the race, has had to calm supporters amid falling poll numbers and some conversational gaffes on the stump.  But Bush’s team has stuck to the plan of illuminating the conservative former Florida governor’s record in the early primary states, and Bush more than any other candidate has cherry-picked supporters and talented staff from the now-defunct Rick Perry and Scott Walker campaigns.
While Rubio is the beneficiary of press attention as the Summer of Trump winds to a close, Bush’s focus on the largely unheralded mechanics of a durable campaign – wooing opinion leaders, building voter files, working on ballot access, conducting effective retail politics in the small venues of Iowa and New Hampshire, touting Bush’s real accomplishments in solid TV ads in early primary states – may be beginning to have the intended effect. Like the nerdy protagonist Mark Watney in The Martian, Bush has decided that in order to win he’s going to have to “science the shit out of this thing” and, starting today, we might be seeing the first glimmers of the success of that approach.
On Sunday morning an NBC/Wall Street Journal poll was released revealing the results of a voter sample taken during the last week of September. While the perception among the chattering class is that Rubio has surged in the past few weeks, the poll numbers tell a different story. According to the poll, Bush increased his vote share in both New Hampshire and Iowa and

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Bob Sparks: Will Republican Party of Florida force presidential candidates to attend November summit?

Thursday, September 17th, 2015

The second GOP debate is history. In a few days, polls will tell us who did well, or not so well, in the minds of voters. The final debate is set for Florida on March 10, just five days before the Florida Primary (although early voting begins March 5).
It is impossible to predict how many candidates will remain six months from now for that debate. If the Tallahassee leadership of the Republican Party of Florida (RPOF) has its way, the number of candidates on the primary ballot will be determined by their response to an “invitation.”
The RPOF is considering a requirement that GOP presidential candidates make an appearance at November’s Sunshine State Summit in Orlando. Under the proposal, those failing to at least make an appearance would forfeit their place on the Florida primary ballot.
If approved, Florida’s ballot would have just two names on it: Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio. Both have accepted invitations to appear in Orlando either November 13 or 14. Former Vice President Dick Cheney is the featured speaker at a dinner on the evening of November 12.
RPOF Chairman and state Rep. Blaise Ingoglia, along with Executive Director Brad Herold, are frustrated at the lack of attention being paid to Florida by the 16 remaining candidates. They seek some of the love and attention currently being showered upon other states, especially South Carolina, next year’s first Southern primary state.
Dr. Ben Carson, who now resides in Palm Beach County, sent regrets because he had already committed to an event in South Carolina. The RPOF believes Carson could do a fly-in and fly-out appearance at the summit.
Forcing the candidates to jump through this hoop has trouble written all over it. The proposal has support within the party’s grassroots leadership, while others are concerned.
Politico’s enterprising reporter, Matt Dixon, obtained the

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Martin Dyckman: Legislators should consider the Iowa example

Tuesday, September 15th, 2015

In the far from perfect world of politics, there’s a place that in one respect is as near to perfection as anyone could expect.
The state legislature redistricts itself, yet both parties accept the outcomes as fair, the resulting elections are unusually competitive and the courts don’t have to get involved. Gerrymandering is for the history books, not the current events pages
That’s obviously the extreme opposite of what happens in Tallahassee, Florida’s capital of confusion, chaos and conspiracy.
The model state is Iowa, home of the world’s most overrated political caucuses and the most respected redistricting system.
Like every other state, Iowa is required to remap its congressional and legislative districts after every decennial federal census so as to keep the populations as equal, or nearly equal, as possible.
In states such as Florida, this is done under the control of the majority party, which uses its power to strengthen itself at the minority’s expense. That’s if they don’t get caught slyly but shamelessly gerrymandering like the Florida Senate did.
California, New Jersey, Arizona, Montana, Idaho, Hawaii and Washington have independent commissions to carry out both their congressional and legislative redistricting process. There are mixed opinions as to how truly independent these commissions are.
Six other states let their legislatures redistrict Congress but have independent commissions to keep the lawmakers from rigging their state constituencies.
Iowa is unlike any of the others. The Legislature and governor have the last word on both sets of plans, but – this is important – they do not have the first word.
There, the map-drawing is the job of highly skilled and highly professional people, demographers and cartographers usually, who work for the state’s Legislative Services Agency. There are strict standards against gerrymandering for the sake of a party, an incumbent, or a potential candidate.
A bipartisan commission is appointed every 10 years

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Julie Delegal: Jeb Bush vilifies unwed mothers, ignores economic reality

Monday, August 17th, 2015

As former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush abandons his Paleolithic diet by eating a fried Snickers bar in Iowa, feminists everywhere wish he’d abandon his stone-age ideology, too. Bush wants to “publicly shame” mothers who give birth out of wedlock, arguing that the lack of stigma is what causes illegitimate births.
With apologies to Sam Cooke, it would appear that Bush “don’t know much biology.” Stigma doesn’t cause unwed births. And women don’t get pregnant by themselves.
The hullabaloo around Bush’s attitudes toward women center on his 1995 book, Profiles in Character. To his credit, one offending paragraph in his chapter on shame does mention the role of men in unwed births.
But the “historical roots” of shame that Bush would return to — the kind we all read about in high school in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s classic, The Scarlet Letter — puts the onus squarely on women. Bush has observed, correctly, that there is much less stigma today than there was in 1850, Hawthorne’s time, or even 1950.
The decline in stigma may have more to do with protecting children than with exalting unwed mothers, however. How do you stigmatize an unwed pregnancy without hurting the ultimate product of that pregnancy?
The fact that stigma has declined, however, cannot be conflated with the motivation for young parents’ to raise their children outside of marriage.
Here’s what conservatives like Bush don’t want to acknowledge: Marriage rates are inextricably linked to America’s economy.
Professor Andrew Cherlin teaches sociology and public policy at Johns Hopkins University, and has written a book called The Marriage-Go-Round. In a column he published in 2013 in The New York Times, Cherlin argues that college-educated, employed, affluent people marry young, while non-college-educated people postpone nuptials, viewing marriage more as a sign that they’ve “made it” than as a prerequisite for child-rearing.
Cherlin links the decline of marriage

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Julie Delegal: Jeb Bush vilifies unwed mothers, ignores economic reality

Monday, August 17th, 2015

As former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush abandons his Paleolithic diet by eating a fried Snickers bar in Iowa, feminists everywhere wish he’d abandon his stone-age ideology, too. Bush wants to “publicly shame” mothers who give birth out of wedlock, arguing that the lack of stigma is what causes illegitimate births.
With apologies to Sam Cooke, it would appear that Bush “don’t know much biology.” Stigma doesn’t cause unwed births. And women don’t get pregnant by themselves.
The hullabaloo around Bush’s attitudes toward women center on his 1995 book, Profiles in Character. To his credit, one offending paragraph in his chapter on shame does mention the role of men in unwed births.
But the “historical roots” of shame that Bush would return to — the kind we all read about in high school in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s classic, The Scarlet Letter — puts the onus squarely on women. Bush has observed, correctly, that there is much less stigma today than there was in 1850, Hawthorne’s time, or even 1950.
The decline in stigma may have more to do with protecting children than with exalting unwed mothers, however. How do you stigmatize an unwed pregnancy without hurting the ultimate product of that pregnancy?
The fact that stigma has declined, however, cannot be conflated with the motivation for young parents’ to raise their children outside of marriage.
Here’s what conservatives like Bush don’t want to acknowledge: Marriage rates are inextricably linked to America’s economy.
Professor Andrew Cherlin teaches sociology and public policy at Johns Hopkins University, and has written a book called The Marriage-Go-Round. In a column he published in 2013 in The New York Times, Cherlin argues that college-educated, employed, affluent people marry young, while non-college-educated people postpone nuptials, viewing marriage more as a sign that they’ve “made it” than as a prerequisite for child-rearing.
Cherlin links the decline of marriage

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