Posts Tagged ‘John Delaney’

Rick Scott talks John Delaney leaving UNF, Lenny Curry as CFO

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

Despite a persistent narrative in Jacksonville political circles that Gov. Rick Scott wanted John Delaney gone from the University of North Florida, and wants Lenny Curry to replace Jeff Atwater as CFO, neither narrative got any traction from Scott’s remarks Wednesday to this outlet in Orange Park.
When asked about Delaney, Scott managed to avoid mentioning the longtime UNF President by name.
“My job is to focus on the entire state, and I have a good Board of Governors and trustees at all these universities,” Scott said.
“I think our presidents are working hard,” Scott continued. “U.S. News and World Report just came out and said that we’re the number one state for higher education, so I’m appreciative of all of them.”
When asked directly if he had any issue with Delaney, the governor said no, throwing cold water on that narrative.
Delaney adamantly denied this narrative, including an affirmative statement this week that the trustees wanted him to renew his contract.

Political friends and enemies that might want to see Lenny Curry gone from the Jacksonville mayor’s office might want to reassess also, in light of less than specific comments from the governor.
“I’m going to pick the right person,” Scott said. “Lenny’s been a good friend and a good mayor. I don’t think CFO Atwater’s even leaving until the end of session.”
In other words: while Curry is not out of the running, there’s no rush for the mayor to look for a house in Tallahassee.
Unlike the Delaney story, the Curry story will continue to develop, in a speculative way, until the governor officially chooses an interim CFO to replace Atwater.
The post Rick Scott talks John Delaney leaving UNF, Lenny Curry as CFO appeared first on Florida Politics.

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Anti-HRO pastor Fred Newbill to replace Warren Jones on JEA Board

Friday, December 2nd, 2016

A pastor who was vocal in his opposition to expanding LGBT rights in Jacksonville is poised to become a member of the JEA Board, via recently filed legislation at the request of the mayor’s office.
And in doing so, that pastor will fill the vacancy of a councilman who introduced a bill for an expanded Human Rights Ordinance in 2012.
Fred Newbill, a Jacksonville pastor who was integral in the transitional period before Mayor Lenny Curry took office in 2015, and who also spoke at the joint inauguration of Curry and Sheriff Mike Williams, is poised to replace Warren Jones, who resigned earlier this year upon his election to the Duval County School Board.
Newbill, who has been politically connected with Republican mayors going back to John Delaney, has been in the news in the last year for political collaborations with Ken Adkins, the formerly politically-connected Brunswick pastor who was indicted on 11 counts of child sex abuse related to his former ministry.
Adkins and Newbill collaborated in opposition to Human Rights Ordinance expansion last December.
Adkins helped to manage a press conference of pastors who wanted to see an HRO referendum (which they expected to sink the bill). But the decision was made to keep the already controversial pastor and fellow HRO opponent Raymond Johnson out of the camera’s eye at that event.
After the push for HRO expansion ended with a withdrawal of both a bill that would do so by ordinance and one that would do so by referendum, Adkins and Newbill continued to collaborate.
The two co-messaged against scandal-ridden Judge Mark Hulsey during Hulsey’s re-election campaign.
Hulsey was re-elected, but is mired in a Judicial Qualifications Commission investigation of racist and sexist remarks he made, as well as a pattern of asking court employees to do work that went beyond their regular duties.
Ironically, when

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Packed agenda for Duval Delegation meeting Wednesday

Monday, November 28th, 2016

The Duval County Legislative Delegation has a lot of new faces and a crowded agenda in front of it on Wednesday afternoon, when they convene at Jacksonville’s city hall.
New to the body: Republican Reps. Cord Byrd of House District 11 and Clay Yarborough in HD 12,  Democratic Rep. Tracie Davis of House District 13, Democratic Rep. Kim Daniels in HD 14, and Republican Rep. Jason Fischer of HD 16.
Those new members — along with veterans Rep. Jay Fant and Senators Audrey Gibson and Aaron Bean — will elect a new chair, a new vice chair, and hear from 44 speakers, ranging from Mayor Lenny Curry to representatives of the school board, local colleges, and sundry local non-profit agencies.
Though 44 speakers sounds like a lot, the number is down from the 60 speakers who addressed the body a year before.
Among some of the more interesting speakers: Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry, whose legislative agenda in the upcoming session won’t be quite as ambitious as the 2016 iteration, in which the combined power of the local and regional delegation was employed to get authorization for the referendum extending a current half-cent sales tax to pay for Jacksonville’s pension debt … assuming that collective bargaining closes at least one of the current pension plans.
Representing the Duval County School Board: Scott Shine, one of the members of the conservative wing of the board. Ironically enough, the current school board chair, Paula Wright, was linked with a possible bid for the seat that Tracie Davis now holds in Tallahassee. However, Wright ultimately demurred on a run.
College presidents will speak, such as University of North Florida head John Delaney and Florida State College Jacksonville president Cynthia Bioteau.
Both schools have seen rapid expansion and evolution of their missions in recent decades, with UNF growing from its former commuter school status to becoming a destination institution. Meanwhile, FSCJ is

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Jacksonville City Council audit maligns mismanaged wetlands mitigation deal

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

The Loblolly Mitigation Bank consists of 6,274 acres of land in Jacksonville’s Westside by US-301.
It was purchased in late 2003, at the end of the John Delaney administration; the city owns 67.25 percent of the land, which is permitted by the St. Johns River Water Management District and the Army Corps of Engineers for the restoration and preservation of uplands and wetlands.
In 2016, the Jacksonville City Council – after 13 years – audited this ongoing relationship between the Loblolly Mitigation Preserve and the city.
Long story short, the audit should have happened much sooner. The city is short $4.71 million as a result, and the auditor’s office encourages amendments to the agreement, and urges this city to pursue all remedies.
The skinny on this deal: “On December 3, 2003, LMP acquired the land from a developer at a price of $12,250,000. That same day, the City purchased the land from LMP for $17,444,900. The purpose of the purchase and the Use Agreement was to make 384 wetland credits available to the City to be used in offsetting wetland impacts created by the numerous roadway and drainage projects that the City was going to be undertaking. Rather than purchase the credits outright, the City opted to invest in a mitigation bank that was anticipated to be able to produce excess credits beyond the City’s needs. Additionally, LMP was to provide the City excess mitigation credits beyond the 384 credits.”
The council auditor’s report says that the city has benefited from the deal, both in terms of receiving wetlands credits and in revenue gains: “As of December 31, 2013, the City had received $25,741,686 in sales proceeds (after taking into account management fees paid to LMP) for a net gain of $8,296,786 from the initial $17,444,900 investment.”
However, the council auditor contends there have been issues,

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Jacksonville City Council audit maligns mismanaged wetlands mitigation deal

Thursday, October 6th, 2016

The Loblolly Mitigation Bank consists of 6,274 acres of land in Jacksonville’s Westside by US-301.
It was purchased in late 2003, at the end of the John Delaney administration; the city owns 67.25 percent of the land, which is permitted by the St. Johns River Water Management District and the Army Corps of Engineers for the restoration and preservation of uplands and wetlands.
In 2016, the Jacksonville City Council – after 13 years – audited this ongoing relationship between the Loblolly Mitigation Preserve and the city.
Long story short, the audit should have happened much sooner. The city is short $4.71 million as a result, and the auditor’s office encourages amendments to the agreement, and urges this city to pursue all remedies.
The skinny on this deal: “On December 3, 2003, LMP acquired the land from a developer at a price of $12,250,000. That same day, the City purchased the land from LMP for $17,444,900. The purpose of the purchase and the Use Agreement was to make 384 wetland credits available to the City to be used in offsetting wetland impacts created by the numerous roadway and drainage projects that the City was going to be undertaking. Rather than purchase the credits outright, the City opted to invest in a mitigation bank that was anticipated to be able to produce excess credits beyond the City’s needs. Additionally, LMP was to provide the City excess mitigation credits beyond the 384 credits.”
The council auditor’s report says that the city has benefited from the deal, both in terms of receiving wetlands credits and in revenue gains: “As of December 31, 2013, the City had received $25,741,686 in sales proceeds (after taking into account management fees paid to LMP) for a net gain of $8,296,786 from the initial $17,444,900 investment.”
However, the council auditor contends there have been issues,

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Julie Delegal: The NRA has gone all the way down the rabbit hole

Wednesday, October 14th, 2015

Rights, even those guaranteed by the constitution, are never absolute.
Free speech rights don’t protect us from libel or slander, for example. They don’t protect us from yelling “fire” in a crowded theater. But so far, no one is challenging the NRA for its abuse of the First Amendment: spreading misinformation about guns in America.
The biggest deception that NRA-brainwashed America has swallowed hook, line and sinker is that having more guns around makes us safer. This past Monday, on WJCT’s “First Coast Connect” radio show, Jacksonville lawyer and NRA spokesman Cord Byrd spread that mendacity yet again.
But science tells us the opposite of what Byrd and the NRA are saying.
More permissive gun laws directly correlate with higher instances of violent crime. Don’t take my word for it. Read Christopher Ingraham’s article  about the Stanford study in the The Washington Post:
“The totality of the evidence based on educated judgments about the best statistical models suggests that right-to-carry laws are associated with substantially higher rates” of aggravated assault, robbery, rape and murder, Stanford law professor John Donohue said in an interview with the Stanford Report.
The Stanford study sounds the death knell on the now-discredited Lott and Mustard study from 1997 – the one that NRA shills would like to keep peddling. The new study belies the standard NRA shtick: “If those people had only been armed, they would have been able to take down the shooter at (fill in the blank.)”
In case you’re having trouble filling in the blank, your choices are growing. The NRA is talking about movie-goers in Aurora, Colorado; late-night studiers in the Florida State University library; elementary schoolchildren and their teachers in Newtown, Connecticut; community college students in Oregon; the Emmanuel African Methodist Episcopal church in Charleston, South Carolina; and the list goes on and on.
“Silly victims,” the NRA all but

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