Posts Tagged ‘Lester Holt’

Donald Trump auditions Cabinet prospects high above Manhattan

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

Donald Trump held court from his perch high above Manhattan on Monday, receiving a line of former rivals, longtime allies and TV executives while overseeing a presidential transition that at times resembles a reality show like the one he once hosted.
Trump met with nearly a dozen prospective hires, all of whom were paraded in front of the cameras set up in the Trump Tower lobby as they entered an elevator to see the president-elect. Out of public view himself, he fell back on his TV star roots by filming a video that touted his legislative goals once he takes office.
Trump; did not immediately announce any appointments after the meetings, which came on the heels of a two-day whirlwind of interviews at his golf course in Bedminster, New Jersey.
Unlike his predecessors, who often spoke with Cabinet candidates under a cloud of secrecy, Trump has turned the search into a very public audition process. The extraordinary exercise took on a routine feel on Monday: First, former Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown stepped off the gold-plated elevator into the marble-coated lobby after his meeting to declare to waiting reporters that he was “the best person” to become Veterans Affairs secretary.
Next, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, a candidate for interior secretary, did much the same, striding off the lift to say she had “a wonderful discussion” with Trump. Former Texas Governor Rick Perry declined to speak to reporters, but he did take time for a photo with the Naked Cowboy, the underwear-sporting, guitar-strumming New York institution who is normally a fixture at Times Square but has spent recent days camped out at Trump Tower singing about the president-elect.
Democratic Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, who resigned her post on the Democratic National Committee after endorsing Bernie Sanders over Hillary Clinton, also met with Trump but entered and exited

Vote on this story -->>>

Donald Trump auditions Cabinet prospects high above Manhattan

Tuesday, November 22nd, 2016

Donald Trump held court from his perch high above Manhattan on Monday, receiving a line of former rivals, longtime allies and TV executives while overseeing a presidential transition that at times resembles a reality show like the one he once hosted.
Trump met with nearly a dozen prospective hires, all of whom were paraded in front of the cameras set up in the Trump Tower lobby as they entered an elevator to see the president-elect. Out of public view himself, he fell back on his TV star roots by filming a video that touted his legislative goals once he takes office.
Trump; did not immediately announce any appointments after the meetings, which came on the heels of a two-day whirlwind of interviews at his golf course in Bedminster, New Jersey.
Unlike his predecessors, who often spoke with Cabinet candidates under a cloud of secrecy, Trump has turned the search into a very public audition process. The extraordinary exercise took on a routine feel on Monday: First, former Massachusetts Senator Scott Brown stepped off the gold-plated elevator into the marble-coated lobby after his meeting to declare to waiting reporters that he was “the best person” to become Veterans Affairs secretary.
Next, Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin, a candidate for interior secretary, did much the same, striding off the lift to say she had “a wonderful discussion” with Trump. Former Texas Governor Rick Perry declined to speak to reporters, but he did take time for a photo with the Naked Cowboy, the underwear-sporting, guitar-strumming New York institution who is normally a fixture at Times Square but has spent recent days camped out at Trump Tower singing about the president-elect.
Democratic Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, who resigned her post on the Democratic National Committee after endorsing Bernie Sanders over Hillary Clinton, also met with Trump but entered and exited

Vote on this story -->>>

Fox’s Chris Wallace asks precise follow-up that makes news

Thursday, October 20th, 2016

Fox News’ Chris Wallace worked hard to keep the final presidential debate substantive with tough questions to Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, but it was the simplest of queries that extracted the biggest headline.
Noting Trump’s claims Wednesday night that the election was being rigged against him, Wallace asked the Republican whether he would accept the results win or lose, pointing out GOP vice presidential candidate Mike Pence had said that he would. When Trump answered that “we will look at it at the time,” Wallace seemed incredulous.
The veteran newsman pointed out that a peaceful transition of power is one of the nation’s longest traditions, no matter how tough the campaign.
“Are you saying you’re not prepared to commit to that principle?” Wallace asked.
Answered Trump: “I will keep you in suspense.”
Wallace walked the finest of lines during a campaign where debate moderators received an intense focus. As the first-ever general election moderator of Fox News, he had the hopes of an organization in the midst of a tough year riding on him along with additional baggage. Fox critics worried that he’d go easy on Trump because of the GOP bent of Fox’s prime-time lineup.
He kept things straight and issue-oriented and rode herd on the audience and candidates to keep control. Wallace promised he would not take on the role of fact-checker and largely adhered to that, although he had one nasty exchange with Trump in correcting the candidate on statements made in Syria in the last debate.
Wallace tended to open a subject area with a general question before boring in on specifics to each candidate. For instance, he asked each candidate about their philosophies in naming Supreme Court justices, then moved in to ask Clinton about partial-birth abortions and Trump about whether he sought to overturn Roe vs. Wade.
“It was a fair

Vote on this story -->>>

Aaron Bean discusses Donald Trump debate debacle

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

Outside of the Drudge Report poll, most observers agree that Monday night’s debate was an inauspicious performance for GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump.
In a conversation Tuesday, State Sen. Aaron Bean — a strong supporter of Trump, who even helped to open a campaign headquarters earlier this month for the candidate — talked about where the debate went wrong for the Republican standard bearer.
Bean’s critiques are notable because, unlike various media commentators who don’t have a dog in the fight, he very much would like to see Trump prevail.
However, Monday night’s debate didn’t get the job done, Bean said.
“She was let off the hook,” Bean said of Hillary Clinton.
“She’s done so many bad things,” Bean added, and he and others were expecting Trump to pounce on them.
Instead, Clinton — who Bean allowed was “well-prepared” — was “let off too easy.”
“I’m grateful there are two more debates,” Bean said.
When asked what Trump could key in on, Bean noted that the country right now is a “disaster” with 95 million people out of the workforce, and one in five homes having no working person in the house.
“She is going to be Obama’s third term,” Bean predicted would be the case were Clinton elected.
Among Trump’s missed opportunities, said Bean: a lack of focus on the national debt and the immigration crisis.
“That’s what won him the Republican nomination,” Bean noted.
Bean noted that Trump needs to make an affirmative case in subsequent debates, as he expected moderators who favor the Democratic nominee to lob “softballs” to Clinton.
When we mentioned that Monday’s moderator, Lester Holt, was a registered Republican, Bean was unmoved.
“I’m looking for a Republican in the heart,” Bean said.
Trump, Bean added, needs to “paint a picture” of the differences between his Democratic opponent and himself.

The post Aaron Bean discusses Donald Trump debate debacle appeared first on Florida Politics.

Vote on this story -->>>

Mitch Perry Report for 9.27.16 – The ‘what difference does it make?’ debate

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

Was it as good as you hoped it would be, America?
For months, people have talked about how they could not wait to watch Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump battle it out in their first presidential debate. We all know that excitement wasn’t because of Clinton’s sterling debate style. No, it was because of the unknown about how The Donald would perform.
And….?
Let’s put it this way: Kellyanne Conway, Trump’s campaign manager, just said on MSNBC this morning that Clinton failed to deliver the knockout punch. Absolutely true, so is that how we’re grading this thing?
Look, under any which way you score a debate, Mrs. Clinton had the winning hand. But as Marco Rubio and Jeb Bush can tell you, traditional scoring points don’t necessarily mean much in debating against Donald J.
Conservatives are upset at the question selections offered by moderator Lester Holt – no Benghazi, no Clinton Foundation, no immigration. But as some said about the criticism of NBC’s Matt Lauer after the “Commander in Chief” forum, if you’re complaining about the moderator, you’re probably losing.
Many of the questions did put Trump in a vise – his explanations for not disclosing his income taxes felt hollow (where he boasted about not paying them), and his attempt to blame Sidney Blumenthal and Patti Solis Doyle regarding where Barack Obama was born seemed weak.
On style, it was interesting to see how long Trump would stay relatively subdued before he became the more blustery, bombastic candidate who dominated most of the Republican presidential debates in 2015 and early 2016.
The momentum has been moving Trump’s away in the past two weeks. Does that get stalled now? Does Clinton pick up some of the undecided voters, or Berniebros who are flirting with Jill Stein and/or Gary Johnson?
So many questions. My favorite line this morning though is the phrase that “this really doesn’t change much.”
Then why all the hype in the first place?
In other news..
House District

Vote on this story -->>>

Analysis: In debate, Hillary Clinton was prepared, Donald Trump was Trump

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

She was at her best. He was not at his worst.
Weeks of Super Bowl-style hype aside, Monday night’s 90 minutes of heated clashes between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump probably didn’t shove many undecided voters off the fence.
If Clinton aimed to push her famously unpredictable opponent into a made-for-sharing disqualifying moment, she didn’t quite get there. If Trump set out to show America — particularly women — he’s completed the transformation from cartoonish pop culture staple to leader worthy of the Oval Office, he still has a way to go.
But in a debate full of feisty exchanges and a personal scuffle or two, the candidates demonstrated clearly how they’ve gotten this far. Clinton was polished, prepared and proud of it —a Hermione Granger at a podium. She came with sharp and practiced answers, most notably a newly direct one for the questions about her private email server that has dogged her candidacy for months. She grinned broadly and calmly, even when under fire, and she mocked but only gently the man she called “Donald.”
“I think Donald just criticized me for preparing for this debate. And, yes, I did,” Clinton said. “And you know what else I prepared for? I prepared to be president. And I think that’s a good thing.”
Trump addressed his opponent as “Secretary Clinton” — even asking for her approval for the term — but by the end he called her “Hillary.”
The care he took with her title was a reminder of the voters he was aiming to win over. Women, particularly college-educated white women, are the key to Trump turning his current burst of momentum into a sustained surge that lasts until Election Day. The 70-year-old businessman has struggled to persuade women, even those with doubts about the first woman president, to get behind his bid, thanks

Vote on this story -->>>

Updates from the 1st presidential debate

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

The Latest on the first of three presidential debates between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump (all times EDT):
10:45 p.m.
Both candidates concluded the first presidential debate by saying they will accept the outcome if the other wins.
Hillary Clinton spoke directly to viewers and said, “It’s not about us, it’s about you.”
Donald Trump initially dodged the same question, saying he would make a “seriously troubled” America “great again.” He added: “I’m going to be able to do it. I don’t believe Hillary Clinton will.”
But Trump finished his answer by saying that if Clinton wins, “I will absolutely support her.”
___
10:43 p.m.
Hillary Clinton is punching back at Donald Trump’s assertions that she doesn’t have the “stamina” to be president.
Trump has questioned whether Clinton has the physical fitness to be president and he repeated the criticism to her directly during the debate. Clinton’s response? Trump shouldn’t talk about stamina until he’s tried out the busy schedule she kept up as secretary of state.
Trump didn’t answer moderator Lester Holt’s original question about his past comments that Clinton doesn’t have the “presidential look.”
Clinton suggested the remarks were about gender, and she reminded the crowd of Trump’s past comments calling women “pigs” and other derogatory names.
___
10:42 p.m.
Donald Trump says NATO needs to “go into the Middle East with us” to combat the Islamic State group. And he is taking credit for NATO focusing resources on combating terrorism.
In fact, the alliance agreed in July to contribute aircraft and conduct training in Iraq and has increased intelligence coordination there. And NATO set up an anti-terrorism program in 2004 — years before Trump criticized them as a presidential candidate.
Earlier this year, Trump criticized NATO for not focusing on terrorism. He said that afterward, he saw an article reporting that NATO was opening a new, major anti-terrorism division.
He said Tuesday

Vote on this story -->>>

Fact check: Donald Trump on Iraq War

Tuesday, September 27th, 2016

A claim from the presidential debate and how it stacks up with the facts:
TRUMP: “Wrong. Wrong,” he said when Clinton pointed out that he supported the Iraq war. Trump later returned to the issue when asked about it by moderator Lester Holt. “I did not support the war in Iraq,” he said. “That is a mainstream media nonsense put out by her. I was against the war in Iraq.”
THE FACTS: There is no evidence Trump expressed public opposition to the war before the U.S. invaded. Rather, he offered lukewarm support. The billionaire businessman only began to voice doubts about the conflict well after it began in March 2003.
His first known public comment on the topic came on Sept. 11, 2002, when he was asked whether he supported a potential Iraq invasion in an interview with radio host Howard Stern. “Yeah, I guess so,” Trump responded after a brief hesitation, according to a recording of the interview. Trump then alluded to the first Gulf War in 1991, which ended with Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein still in power. “You know, I wish it was, I wish the first time it was done correctly.”
On March 21, 2003, just days after the invasion began, Trump said the invasion “looks like a tremendous success from a military standpoint.”
That September, he said he “would have fought terrorism, but not necessarily Iraq.” In December, he told Fox News that “a lot of people (are) questioning the whole concept of going in in the first place.” But he stopped short of saying that he was among those opponents.
In fact, Trump had voiced support for a hypothetical invasion of Iraq before President George W. Bush took office. In his 2000 book, “The America We Deserve,” Trump suggested that he would be in favor of a pre-emptive strike if Iraq

Vote on this story -->>>

Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump battle fiercely over taxes, race, terror

Monday, September 26th, 2016

In a combative opening debate, Hillary Clinton emphatically denounced Donald Trump Monday night for keeping his personal tax returns and business dealings secret from voters and peddling a “racist lie” about President Barack Obama. Businessman Trump repeatedly cast Clinton as a “typical politician” as he sought to capitalize on Americans’ frustration with Washington.
Locked in an exceedingly close White House race, the presidential rivals tangled for 90-minutes over their vastly different visions for the nation’s future. Clinton called for lowering taxes for the middle class, while Trump focused more on renegotiating trade deals that he said have caused companies to move jobs out of the U.S. The Republican backed the controversial “stop-and-frisk policing” tactic as a way to bring down crime, while the Democrat said the policy was unconstitutional and ineffective.
The debate was heated from the start, with Trump frequently trying to interrupt Clinton and speaking over her answers. Clinton was more measured and restrained, but also needled the sometimes-thin-skinned Trump over his business record and wealth.
“There’s something he’s hiding,” she declared, scoffing at his repeated contention that he won’t release his tax returns because he is being audited.
Trump aggressively tried to turn the transparency questions around on Clinton, who has struggled to overcome voters’ concerns about her honestly and trustworthiness. He said he would release his tax information when she produces more than 30,000 emails that were deleted from the personal internet server she used as secretary of state.
Tax experts have said there is no reason the businessman cannot make his records public during an audit.
Clinton was contrite in addressing her controversial email use, saying simply that it was a “mistake”. She notably did not fall back on many of the excuses she has often used for failing to use a government email during her four years as secretary of

Vote on this story -->>>

Moderator Lester Holt under scrutiny during debate

Monday, September 26th, 2016

Everyone’s aware of the stakes for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump during the first presidential debate, but there’s a third person in the equation who faces a different pressure: Lester Holt.
The NBC News veteran is moderating his first general election debate, making him solely responsible for the questions asked each candidate and for steering the conversation. His performance will be closely watched, particularly in light of a dispute over the extent to which he should call politicians out for making untrue statements.
Holt, 57, has kept quiet about his preparations. The NBC “Nightly News” anchor took over his job last year after predecessor Brian Williams was found to have lied about his role in news stories.
Like the moderators for all three presidential debates this fall, it’s Holt’s first time in that role for a general election debate. He hosted a Democratic primary forum in January, and has interviewed Clinton and Trump three times each during the campaign.
In a reflection of the attention that will be paid to Holt, his voter registration became an issue last week.
“Lester is a Democrat,” Trump said in a Fox News Channel interview. “It’s a phony system. They are all Democrats.”
Holt, however, is a registered Republican, according to New York state voting records.
Asked about the misstatement on Monday, Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway said on MSNBC that it wasn’t a lie because Trump didn’t know Holt’s voter registration.
Voting records show that Anderson Cooper of CNN, who is moderating the Oct. 5 debate, is registered unaffiliated with a party in New York and Chris Wallace of Fox News, the moderator on Oct. 19, is a registered Democrat in Washington, D.C. Martha Raddatz, who will join Cooper, lives in Virginia, which doesn’t register voters by party, and ABC would not discuss her affiliation.
That illustrates on a small scale the

Vote on this story -->>>

Joe Henderson: 5 things we’re curious about the Hillary Clinton-Donald Trump debate

Monday, September 26th, 2016

Things we are curious about for the Trump-Clinton I: The Debate.
The television audience
How many people will be watching? Well, a lot – that’s for sure. Some predict the audience could exceed 100 million people. The record audience for a presidential debate is 80 million people for Ronald Reagan and Jimmy Carter in 1983. By comparison, the audience for the first 2012 debate between President Barack Obama and Mitt Romney was 67.2 million. Even at 100 million though, Clinton and Trump will have to go some to top the 115 million people who watched the Broncos and Panthers February in the Super Bowl. It could surpass the 105.9 million people who watched the final episode of M*A*S*H in 1983, which was the most-watched regular TV show ever. For both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, this likely is their best (and last) chance to make a dynamic impact. Even though there are two more scheduled debates, it is likely neither will be watched as closely as this one.
Lester Holt
Being the moderator at an event like this is almost an impossible task, especially considering the volatility of emotions from supporters of either candidate. Lester Holt accepted the seat on the dunk tank for this one and both camps already raised doubts about him. He can expect to have more barbs thrown in his direction if he challenges either candidate on their answer or if, like Matt Lauer, he lets things pass. Trump already labeled Holt a Democrat (he’s a registered Republican), and since facts don’t much matter in social media, that’s red meat for the hungry hordes. If either candidate, but most likely Trump, decides to make Holt an issue during or after the debate, Twitter might explode.
What’s at stake for Florida
With polls showing a tight U.S. Senate race between Marco Rubio

Vote on this story -->>>

Thoughts on tonight’s debate: Could Donald Trump really win this thing?

Monday, September 26th, 2016

Everyone loves a great show; tonight, we are sure to get one.
In what is the most highly awaited political event in modern history, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump square off Monday evening in the first presidential debate from Long Island’s Hofstra University hosted by Lester Holt of NBC News.
However, with the bar set exceedingly high for Clinton (and low, in the case of Trump), it begs an obvious question: could Trump actually win this thing?
Many anticipate the television audience to rival that of a Super Bowl — more than 100 million people — perhaps making it one of the most-watched shows of the year, if not of all time.
And with the all-bets-are-off nature of the 2016 race, certain things could tip the balance to Trump.
 “According to the numbers, the debates have done little to change the fundamental structure of recent presidential races,” writes Dante Chinni of NBC News. Comparing pre-debate polling with final election results for every election since 1992, the debate may have made a serious difference in only a single campaign — 2000.
Although Democrat Al Gore did technically get more of the popular vote than his Republican opponent, George W. Bush, the core layout of the polling remained the same through Election Day, giving post-debate polls a 6-for-6 streak.
Of course, debates are remembered more for individual moments, rather than the effect they have on the electorate. In 1988, Michael Dukakis responded coolly to a question about the death penalty if his wife were raped and murdered. Gore famously sighed during his debate with Bush, while George H.W. Bush appeared bored and was caught checking his watch during the debate with Bill Clinton in 1992.
None of these isolated incidents had any overall impact on the nature of the race, despite the high-stakes character of the debates themselves.
That said, 2016 is an election like no other — a bitter, contentious race between

Vote on this story -->>>

Debate Night: Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump set for high-stakes showdown

Monday, September 26th, 2016

After months of tangling from afar, Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will confront each other face-to-face for the first time in Monday night’s presidential debate, laying out for voters their vastly different visions for America’s future.
The high-stakes showdown — the first of three presidential debates — comes as both candidates are viewed negatively by large numbers of Americans, with Democrat Clinton facing questions about her trustworthiness and Republican Trump struggling to convince many voters that he has the temperament and policy depth to be president.
Interest in the presidential race has been intense, and the campaigns are expecting a record-breaking audience to watch the 90-minute televised debate at suburban New York’s Hofstra University.
Clinton, a former senator and secretary of state, is banking on voters seeing her as a steady hand who can build on the record of President Barack Obama, whose popularity is rising as he winds down his second term in office. She’s called for expanding Obama’s executive orders if Congress won’t pass legislation to overhaul the nation’s immigration system and for broader gun control measures. Overseas, she’s called for a no-fly zone in Syria but has vowed to keep the military out of a large-scale ground war to defeat the Islamic State group.
For Clinton, victory in November largely hinges on rallying the same young and diverse coalition that elected Obama but has yet to fully embrace her. Her campaign manager, Robby Mook, told “CBS This Morning” on Monday that she fully understood she still needs to earn voters’ trust.
“When she’s had the opportunity to talk about not just what her plans are to make a difference in people’s lives, but how this campaign is really part of a lifelong mission to fight for kids and families, she’s done really well,” Mook said.
Trump has tapped into deep anxieties among some Americans,

Vote on this story -->>>

Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump buff foreign policy bona fides on debate eve

Sunday, September 25th, 2016

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were meeting separately with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu Sunday, giving the each candidate fresh bragging rights about their knowledge of foreign policy and readiness to lead the nation on the eve of their first presidential debate.
Trump and Netanyahu discussed “at length” Israel’s use of a fence to help secure its borders, an example Trump frequently cites when he’s talking about the wall he wants to build between the U.S. and Mexico.
“Trump recognized that Israel and its citizens have suffered far too long on the front lines of Islamic terrorism,” the campaign said in a statement. “He agreed with Prime Minister Netanyahu that the Israeli people want a just and lasting peace with their neighbors, but that peace will only come when the Palestinians renounce hatred and violence and accept Israel as a Jewish State.”
Clinton was expected to meet with the prime minister later in the day, also in New York.
The meeting was designed to put Israel on good footing with the next U.S. president. But it also served to showcase the candidates’ expertise in foreign policy in the shadow of their first debate Monday, six weeks before Election Day. Clinton, a former senator and secretary of state, often says that Trump does not know enough about the world and lacks the temperament to be president. Trump has argued that he has extensive experience with foreign policy through his career as a business executive and blames Clinton for many of the nation’s stumbles in foreign policy.
Meanwhile, the candidates deployed their top supporters to the Sunday shows to take early jabs at their opponents and lower expectations for a showdown expected to draw 75 million viewers — many of them disenchanted with both candidates, the least-popular presidential hopefuls in history.
Facts and who will determine them during

Vote on this story -->>>

THE MIAMI METROPOLIS -your source for news, music, sports, movies, restaurants, reviews, weather, travel, arts, tech and events in Miami