Posts Tagged ‘Panama papers’

Mysterious Saudi businessman in 9/11 puzzle surfaces – online

Tuesday, May 9th, 2017

By Dan Christensen
FloridaBulldog.org
A mysterious figure at the center of the puzzle about an apparent Sarasota-area support network for 9/11 hijackers is a rich Saudi Arabian businessman with ties to the kingdom’s ruling House of Saud and international and American political leaders.
The post Mysterious Saudi businessman in 9/11 puzzle surfaces – online appeared first on Florida Bulldog.

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Transparency and trust are necessary for democracy, says Jacksonville ethics director

Monday, December 5th, 2016

In Jacksonville, the name Carla Miller is synonymous with ethics.
Miller, the city’s ethics director, wrote the city’s first ethics code and first started serving as an ethics officer in Duval in 1997.
As the city has grown, Miller has been a constant. And in her role, she has come to understand the incremental nature of improvement in transparency, which happens, she says, step by “next little step.”
Meanwhile, Miller has become a global authority on intragovernmental ethics. So global, in fact, that she was in Panama earlier this month, where she participated on a United Nations panel: “Building trust at local level: the role of transparency in local government to promote citizen participation in public affairs.”
Miller moderated a panel involving mayors from Belize, Colombia, Spain, and a representative from the Canadian Federation of Municipalities.
The subject: the “crisis of confidence” in the role of the public sector, with a jarring hypothesis – most “of the public trust in government is produced (or lost) at the local level.”
Miller, in discussing her panel, noted the similarities between the global and local spheres, in that the issues relative to corruption and loss of public trust are similar throughout the world.
And that for localities, there is an opportunity: there is more of an opportunity locally to feed solutions vertically, globally.
Miller noted that, when people discerned she was from Florida, there was an expectation that transparency as manifested in the Sunshine Law translated into an open society and a feeling of participatory democracy.
However, the esoteric framing of data and documents can inhibit what the transparency really means.
“It doesn’t make a difference,” Miller said, “if the data isn’t presented [in a way] that the average citizen can understand.”
With that in mind, open source software – such as mysociety.org, exposingtheinvisible.org, and theyworkforyou.com – are valuable resources for those wanting to

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Transparency and trust are necessary for democracy, says Jacksonville ethics director

Monday, December 5th, 2016

In Jacksonville, the name Carla Miller is synonymous with ethics.
Miller, the city’s ethics director, wrote the city’s first ethics code and first started serving as an ethics officer in Duval in 1997.
As the city has grown, Miller has been a constant. And in her role, she has come to understand the incremental nature of improvement in transparency, which happens, she says, step by “next little step.”
Meanwhile, Miller has become a global authority on intragovernmental ethics. So global, in fact, that she was in Panama earlier this month, where she participated on a United Nations panel: “Building trust at local level: the role of transparency in local government to promote citizen participation in public affairs.”
Miller moderated a panel involving mayors from Belize, Colombia, Spain, and a representative from the Canadian Federation of Municipalities.
The subject: the “crisis of confidence” in the role of the public sector, with a jarring hypothesis – most “of the public trust in government is produced (or lost) at the local level.”
Miller, in discussing her panel, noted the similarities between the global and local spheres, in that the issues relative to corruption and loss of public trust are similar throughout the world.
And that for localities, there is an opportunity: there is more of an opportunity locally to feed solutions vertically, globally.
Miller noted that, when people discerned she was from Florida, there was an expectation that transparency as manifested in the Sunshine Law translated into an open society and a feeling of participatory democracy.
However, the esoteric framing of data and documents can inhibit what the transparency really means.
“It doesn’t make a difference,” Miller said, “if the data isn’t presented [in a way] that the average citizen can understand.”
With that in mind, open source software – such as mysociety.org, exposingtheinvisible.org, and theyworkforyou.com – are valuable resources for those wanting to

Vote on this story -->>>

Transparency and trust are necessary for democracy, says Jacksonville ethics director

Monday, December 5th, 2016

In Jacksonville, the name Carla Miller is synonymous with ethics.
Miller, the city’s ethics director, wrote the city’s first ethics code and first started serving as an ethics officer in Duval in 1997.
As the city has grown, Miller has been a constant. And in her role, she has come to understand the incremental nature of improvement in transparency, which happens, she says, step by “next little step.”
Meanwhile, Miller has become a global authority on intragovernmental ethics. So global, in fact, that she was in Panama earlier this month, where she participated on a United Nations panel: “Building trust at local level: the role of transparency in local government to promote citizen participation in public affairs.”
Miller moderated a panel involving mayors from Belize, Colombia, Spain, and a representative from the Canadian Federation of Municipalities.
The subject: the “crisis of confidence” in the role of the public sector, with a jarring hypothesis – most “of the public trust in government is produced (or lost) at the local level.”
Miller, in discussing her panel, noted the similarities between the global and local spheres, in that the issues relative to corruption and loss of public trust are similar throughout the world.
And that for localities, there is an opportunity: there is more of an opportunity locally to feed solutions vertically, globally.
Miller noted that, when people discerned she was from Florida, there was an expectation that transparency as manifested in the Sunshine Law translated into an open society and a feeling of participatory democracy.
However, the esoteric framing of data and documents can inhibit what the transparency really means.
“It doesn’t make a difference,” Miller said, “if the data isn’t presented [in a way] that the average citizen can understand.”
With that in mind, open source software – such as mysociety.org, exposingtheinvisible.org, and theyworkforyou.com – are valuable resources for those wanting to

Vote on this story -->>>

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