Posts Tagged ‘Politico’

Report: Brian Mast linked to Florida company under investigation by federal regulators

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

Rep. Brian Mast has been linked to a Florida marketing company under investigation by federal regulators, according to POLITICO.
World Patent Marketing and its owner has been accused by the Federal Trade Commission of defrauding clients of millions of dollars. On Thursday, POLITICO reported Mast, a Treasure Coast Republican, was appointed to the company’s advisory board in February 2016, before the   company’s owner, Scott J. Cooper, donated more than $5,000 to his campaign.
Mast told POLITICO he never received compensation from the company, and became aware he became a member of the board through a press release someone else sent him.
According to POLITICO, a Florida district court agreed with an FTC request to temporarily free the company’s assets earlier this month. The Federal Trade Commission claims Cooper, through World Patent Marketing and Desa Industries, charged customers thousands of dollars to patent and market their inventions.
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White House bars major news outlets from gaggle

Friday, February 24th, 2017

News organizations including The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, CNN and POLITICO were blocked from joining an informal, on the record White House press briefing Friday.
The Associated Press chose not to participate in the gaggle following the move by White House press secretary Sean Spicer.
“The AP believes the public should have as much access to the president as possible,” Lauren Easton, the AP’s director of media relations, said in a statement.
Several news organizations were allowed in, including the conservative website Breitbart News. The site’s former executive chairman, Steve Bannon, is chief strategist to President Donald Trump.
The White House defended the decision not to include some news organizations.
“We invited the pool so everyone was represented. We decided to add a couple of additional people beyond the pool. Nothing more than that,” said White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders.
Earlier Friday in a speech before the Conservative Political Action Conference, President Donald Trump railed against the media.
Reaction from barred media outlets was swift.
“Nothing like this has ever happened at the White House in our long history of covering multiple administrations of different parties. We strongly protest the exclusion of The New York Times and the other news organizations. Free media access to a transparent government is obviously of crucial national interest,” Dean Baquet, the Times’ executive editor, said in a statement.
“This is an unacceptable development by the Trump White House. Apparently, this is how they retaliate when you report facts they don’t like. We’ll keep reporting regardless,” CNN said in a statement.
Republished with permission of The Associated Press.
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Debbie Wasserman Schultz says Michael Flynn’s resignation ‘marks a beginning, not an end’

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

Debbie Wasserman Schultz said Tuesday that the revelations about former National Security Adviser Mike Flynn’s conversations with the Russians are only the beginning.
“Flynn’s resignation marks a beginning, not an end,” said the South Florida Democratic Representative in a statement on Tuesday.
Flynn resigned Monday night after it reports were confirmed over the weekend that he discussed lifting U.S. sanctions on Russia with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak before Donald Trump had officially been inaugurated as president. For more than a month Flynn had denied that his conversation with Kislyak had involved anything other than some pleasantries, a statement that Vice President Mike Pence repeated several times.

Wasserman Schultz says that Flynn’s resignation was not only warranted, but overdue. But she says his exit raises more questions than it answers.
“It’s still unclear who and what was known in the White House about his diplomatic discussions with Russia before then-President Obama left office,” she says. “And if the Justice Department warned the White House last month that Flynn had misled them about his communications with a Russian diplomat, and therefore was vulnerable to blackmail by Moscow, why was he still on the job? This entire episode reaffirms the need for an independent, bipartisan investigation into the influence Russia has had on our elections, our national security and the current occupant of the White House. Flynn’s resignation marks a beginning, not an end.”

California Democrat Adam Schiff told his fellow House Democrats that more information regarding Flynn’s conversations with the Russians will surface in the coming days, POLITICO reports.

 
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Tampa Bay Times’ Anthony Cormier leaving to work for BuzzFeed News

Monday, December 12th, 2016

Tampa Bay Times Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter Anthony Cormier is leaving the paper to join BuzzFeed News in New York next month.
Along with the Times’ Leonora LaPeter Anton and the Sarasota Herald Tribune’s Michael Braga, Cormier shared in taking home the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Investigative Reporting for a series on Florida’s unsafe system of state-run mental hospitals.
The 2015 series uncovered nearly 1,000 assaults or injuries in mental hospitals during a period in which $100 million was slashed from the state’s mental health budget. That forced staffing cuts and created an environment where employees were forced to work double shifts and supervise more than a dozen violent and unstable patients alone.
In response, Florida lawmakers passed a measure in the 2016 session that added $16 million to the mental hospitals’ budgets, $2.4 million to contract with psychiatrists and other professional staff members, and $1.5 million for safety equipment such as security cameras and body alarms.
Prior to coming to the Times, Cormier reported for the Sarasota Herald-Tribune. Among his accomplishments there was an investigative series with Braga called, “Breaking the Banks,” The stories showed how some Florida bankers broke the law and looted their own institutions in the pursuit of quick and easy profits during the real estate boom. The reports ultimately led to the indictments of three bankers and lawsuits from the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. It won first prize in the print/online-small category award from Investigative Reporters and Editors in 2014.
Cormier will work in Buzzfeed’s Investigative Unit, which is led by Pulitzer Prize-winning editor Mark Schoofs.  He told POLITICO that Buzzfeed received nearly 700 applications for the investigative reporter position that ultimately went to Cormier.
“We chose Anthony because he has done great work on a whole range of topics, of which [the hospital investigation] is merely the most decorated of his stories,” Schoofs told the website. “If you look at the range of topics that Anthony has covered, it is astounding.”
Cormier is graduate of Florida State University.
The

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Mitch Perry Report for 11.14.16 – Questioning the exit poll data

Monday, November 14th, 2016

Among the significant factoids produced by the exit poll information conducted by Edison Research from last Tuesday’s election was that Donald Trump actually did better than Mitt Romney when it came to winning the Latino vote.
It wasn’t by much, but according to that information, Trump received 29 percent support from Hispanics, better than Romney’s 27 percent in 2012. That seems counterintuitive to some, considering that while Romney’s most egregious comment when it came to immigration was that people would need to “self-deport,” Trump went much further in his language.
Late last week a Latino polling firm totally questioned the data from Edison, raising a larger question, which is – with 47 million people voting before Election Day, how accurate is all the exit poll information, period?
Specifically, the group Latino Decisions simply doesn’t believe Edison regarding the Latino vote number. You can go to its blog post to get their full indictment of the plan, but part of their argument is that Trump’s 29 percent number was at odds with other high-quality, large sample pre-election polling. Univision/Waahington Post had him at 19 percent; NBC/Telemundo oversample  17; NALEO/Telemundo tracking poll  14; FIU/New Latino Voice  13.
Latino Decisions’ Election Eve poll (in the field Nov. 4-7) found that 79 percent of Latinos backed Hillary Clinton, compared to 18 percent for Trump.
“Skeptics might say that all the polls were off this year, but actually, whatever the reason, the national polling miss was only around 1-2% compared to what the popular vote margin will eventually be. These Latino numbers are off by 10-15%,” the Latino Decisions authors write. “That requires a plausible explanation, and secret support for a man who described Latinos as rapists and criminals does not pass the sniff test.  That’s why we see all these speculative stories. We suggest that if the Exit Poll numbers seem inexplicable, maybe they are wrong.”
An official with Edison argued in POLITICO last Friday that they stand

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Senate candidate Steven Machat sues to get himself and other indie candidates into Monday night debate

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Marco Rubio and Patrick Murphy are poised to participate in the first debate of the Florida U.S. Senate on Monday night in Orlando, but independent candidate Steven Machat is still pushing to get himself, Libertarian candidate Paul Stanton, and the three other non-party-affiliated candidates on the big stage as well.
In papers filed with the 11th Judicial Circuit court in Miami-Dade County on Friday, Machat is calling for a temporary restraining order to prohibit the debate sponsors – Cox Media, Leadership Florida Statewide Community Foundation and Capital New Company (the parent company of POLITICO) from putting on Monday nights debate without including the other Senate candidates. The FCC is also listed as a defendant.
“I’m trying to sue on behalf of all the candidates who have qualified to appear in this debate,” Machat told WMNF radio on Thursday. “What happened is our society, and I call it political payola, they’ve created a world where the Republican and Democratic parties, are the only two parties that get the commercial advertisements to promote and market a platform, which doesn’t necessarily mean they’re the people’s parties.”
Machet initially filed a complaint against the sponsors on September 28 in U.S.District Court for the Southern District of Florida.
Christina H. Burrow, an attorney with Cox Media and Orlando ABC affiliate WFTV, wrote back to Machet on October 4, informing him that the sponsors are using a 15 percent polling threshold as the cutoff for inclusion in the debate – the same criteria used by the the Commission on Presidential Debates which has precluded Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson and Green Party candidate Jill Stein from being excluded in the presidential debates.

“Because you do not meet WFTV-TV’s minimum eligibility, standard, you are not entitled to participate in the Debate,” Burrow wrote.
In his filing, Machat is calling for a temporary restraining order prohibiting the debate sponsors from hosting Monday night’s

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Senate candidate Steven Machat sues to get himself and other indie candidates into Monday night debate

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Marco Rubio and Patrick Murphy are poised to participate in the first debate of the Florida U.S. Senate on Monday night in Orlando, but independent candidate Steven Machat is still pushing to get himself, Libertarian candidate Paul Stanton, and the three other non-party-affiliated candidates on the big stage as well.
In papers filed with the 11th Judicial Circuit court in Miami-Dade County on Friday, Machat is calling for a temporary restraining order to prohibit the debate sponsors – Cox Media, Leadership Florida Statewide Community Foundation and Capital New Company (the parent company of POLITICO) from putting on Monday nights debate without including the other Senate candidates. The FCC is also listed as a defendant.
“I’m trying to sue on behalf of all the candidates who have qualified to appear in this debate,” Machat told WMNF radio on Thursday. “What happened is our society, and I call it political payola, they’ve created a world where the Republican and Democratic parties, are the only two parties that get the commercial advertisements to promote and market a platform, which doesn’t necessarily mean they’re the people’s parties.”
Machet initially filed a complaint against the sponsors on September 28 in U.S.District Court for the Southern District of Florida.
Christina H. Burrow, an attorney with Cox Media and Orlando ABC affiliate WFTV, wrote back to Machet on October 4, informing him that the sponsors are using a 15 percent polling threshold as the cutoff for inclusion in the debate – the same criteria used by the the Commission on Presidential Debates which has precluded Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson and Green Party candidate Jill Stein from being excluded in the presidential debates.

“Because you do not meet WFTV-TV’s minimum eligibility, standard, you are not entitled to participate in the Debate,” Burrow wrote.
In his filing, Machat is calling for a temporary restraining order prohibiting the debate sponsors from hosting Monday night’s

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Senate candidate Steven Machat sues to get himself and other indie candidates into Monday night debate

Friday, October 14th, 2016

Marco Rubio and Patrick Murphy are poised to participate in the first debate of the Florida U.S. Senate on Monday night in Orlando, but independent candidate Steven Machat is still pushing to get himself, Libertarian candidate Paul Stanton, and the three other non-party-affiliated candidates on the big stage as well.
In papers filed with the 11th Judicial Circuit court in Miami-Dade County on Friday, Machat is calling for a temporary restraining order to prohibit the debate sponsors – Cox Media, Leadership Florida Statewide Community Foundation and Capital New Company (the parent company of POLITICO) from putting on Monday nights debate without including the other Senate candidates. The FCC is also listed as a defendant.
“I’m trying to sue on behalf of all the candidates who have qualified to appear in this debate,” Machat told WMNF radio on Thursday. “What happened is our society, and I call it political payola, they’ve created a world where the Republican and Democratic parties, are the only two parties that get the commercial advertisements to promote and market a platform, which doesn’t necessarily mean they’re the people’s parties.”
Machet initially filed a complaint against the sponsors on September 28 in U.S.District Court for the Southern District of Florida.
Christina H. Burrow, an attorney with Cox Media and Orlando ABC affiliate WFTV, wrote back to Machet on October 4, informing him that the sponsors are using a 15 percent polling threshold as the cutoff for inclusion in the debate – the same criteria used by the the Commission on Presidential Debates which has precluded Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson and Green Party candidate Jill Stein from being excluded in the presidential debates.

“Because you do not meet WFTV-TV’s minimum eligibility, standard, you are not entitled to participate in the Debate,” Burrow wrote.
In his filing, Machat is calling for a temporary restraining order prohibiting the debate sponsors from hosting Monday night’s

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Mitch Perry Report for 9.29.16 — Congress is free to go home. Again.

Thursday, September 29th, 2016

First of all, congratulations to the uber-hip readers at Creative Loafing who, in their Best of the Bay voting for Best Reporter in 2016, selected a columnist who retired two years ago.
Congratulations also to our U.S. Congress who, by voting for a budget bill last to avoid a government shutdown, now gets to skip town for another two months before returning for an inevitable lame-duck session.
Wait a minute, some of you might think — didn’t they just have a seven-week summer break? Hey, that ended more than three weeks ago, silly.
Actually, let’s look at the details: Part of the deal includes passing a $1.1 billion Zika funding bill, as well as $500 million to Louisiana and other states facing natural disasters.
One of the hangups with why Congress hadn’t previously passed a Zika bill was that the GOP wanted to strip money for Planned Parenthood to combat the mosquito-borne virus. But they lost that gambit, as PP does get funding in the new bill.
Not that all of the Democrats were gracious in victory.
“It is deeply disappointing that until now, Republicans have insisted that the most appropriate response to a virus that overwhelmingly affects pregnant women was to place a politically motivated ban on funding for reproductive healthcare providers,” said Debbie Wasserman Schultz. Indeed, there’s nothing like a deadline. Government funding is scheduled to run out tomorrow. And, of course, there are elections to campaign in. You know, elections for the 435 members of the House where 96 percent of them are expected to win re-election.
Conservatives, meanwhile, are pissed again, saying Republican members sold out — again. POLITICO reports Heritage Action’s Dan Holler is blasting the deal, saying “House Republicans accept being jammed and essentially sit on the sidelines” and Hill Republicans “negotiate behind closed doors with Democrats, essentially giving them what they want.”
In other news …
After several disasters and many attempts,

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Mitch Perry Report for 9.15.16 — One less #NeverTrump option for president in Florida

Thursday, September 15th, 2016

#NeverTrump conservatives in Florida have one less option to choose for president in November now.
Evan McMullin, a 40-year-old former CIA official from Utah, has been proposed as a conservative alternative to Trump. He was the nominee of the Independent Party in Florida, but has been removed from the ballot by the Florida Division of Elections because the Independent Party is not a recognized national party by the Federal Elections Commission — a requirement of state law to get on the ballot.
McMullin is only on the ballot in 10 states so far, making his attempt to deny both Trump and Hillary Clinton the opportunity to get 270 electoral votes less likely.
Meanwhile, Libertarian Gary Johnson‘s campaign announced Tuesday he will be the first third-party presidential candidate to appear on the ballot in all 50 states, plus Washington, D.C., since 1996. An internal McMullin memo reported on by POLITICO argues the Utah native is the much better choice for conservatives.
“With all due respect, Gary Johnson and Jill Stein are narrow-gauge candidates of limited national appeal,” the memo reads. “Whether it’s Stein’s warmed-over magical-thinking socialism and weirdness, or Gary Johnson’s astonishingly weak and dangerous positions on foreign affairs and religious liberty, no other third-party or independent candidate has the background, experience, intelligence, and policy strengths Evan McMullin brings to the national debate.”
Then again, if you’re a conservative whose main passion is making sure to deny Clinton the presidency, you ought to be happy about Johnson (and to a lesser extent Stein’s) presence in the race.
Two new battleground state polls shows the “Johnson effect” in action. A CNN poll shows Trump leading Clinton in Ohio 46-41 in Ohio with Johnson taking 8 percent, and Trump winning 47-44 in Florida, with Johnson at 6 percent.
In other news …
There was plenty coming out of yesterday’s Hillsborough County PTC meeting on

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Patrick Murphy to debate Marco Rubio three times before Nov 8 election

Monday, September 12th, 2016

Patrick Murphy and Marco Rubio will debate three times and participate in a separate campaign forum, bringing an end to speculation that Murphy was reluctant to engage in debates with the GOP Senate incumbent.
The news was first reported by POLITICO’s Marc Caputo Monday afternoon.
The first debate will be held in Orlando on October 17, and is sponsored by POLITICO, ABC affiliate WFTV and Cox Media, and will be broadcast statewide on ABC affiliate stations.
The next debate will the Leadership Florida and Florida Press Association at Broward College in Davie on October 26, also broadcast on ABC affiliates (that debate had previously been announced).
The candidates third debate will be co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters and Telemundo and broadcast on Telemundo stations from Tampa, with the date to be announced.
There will be a separate forum at the Forum Club of the Palm Beaches in West Palm Beach on November 2nd. The broadcaster has not been announced for that forum yet.
The news will undoubtedly please statewide Democrats who weren’t enthused about the perception that Murphy was not eager to debate Rubio, who he trails in virtually every poll published on the U.S. Senate race in Florida.
“I’m excited to debate Marco Rubio and talk about the issues that matter most to Florida families,” said Murphy. “Floridians face an important choice this November, between someone who will show up and work hard for them, and Marco Rubio, who abandoned our state and has the worst vote attendance record of any Florida Senator in nearly 50 years. I look forward to making that choice clear in our upcoming debates.”
The day after the Florida Primary on August 31, Rubio came out and immediately challenged Murphy to six debates. Murphy initially called it a “stunt,” and said he’s only do so if Rubio committed to serving a full six-year term (something that Rubio has not done).
Murphy did

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A.G. Gancarski: So much for the libertarian moment

Monday, October 5th, 2015

I’ve always had a pet theory about when the long-awaited “libertarian moment” would happen. There would be a tipping point of sorts. Governmental debt, the logical victory of civil liberties arguments and a general realization that the American prison-industrial complex was too bloated, inefficient, and corrupt would converge to bring about some common sense solutions to what is currently called “mass incarceration.”
My heart tells me that eventually could happen. My head wonders, meanwhile, when viable proponents of true libertarianism will manifest themselves. In 2016, as with every election cycle for the last few decades, libertarians both nationally and in the Sunshine State find their arguments unable to gain traction, in no small part because of their champions.
Exhibit A, who arguably should come with a caveat: Kentucky U.S. Sen. and soon-to-be-former Republican presidential candidate Rand Paul.
Paul is in the doldrums in terms of polls and fundraising, which surprises some who thought that his willingness to talk about the failures of the war on drugs and racial disparities in prison populations would give him a unique position in the crowded Republican field. Paul had sought to triangulate between the so-called paleo-libertarians who made up his father’s base, while reaching out to traditional Republicans with policies he famously described as “libertarian-ish.”
In attempting to build a bridge between two disparate groups, Paul took a risk, and ended up creating a position that satisfied neither constituency. The former fans of the Ron Paul Survival Report newsletter think he’s soft; the traditional Republicans think he’s an unprincipled wack-job in search of his next filibuster.
There are open questions now about how long Paul will be in the race, open questions about his campaign fundraising, and an open revolt from the Super PAC side.
“I have stopped raising money for him until I see the campaign correct its problems,” said

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Peter Schorsch: Is it time to bet on Jeb Bush again?

Sunday, October 4th, 2015

Earlier this week, POLITICO ran “5 Reasons to Bet $5 on Marco Rubio” and tried to make the case for a path to the presidency for Florida’s talented junior senator.
Rubio has had very good showings in the first two debates — the same in which Jeb Bush had performed at what charitably might be called a workmanlike level. And Bush, the self-described tortoise in the race, has had to calm supporters amid falling poll numbers and some conversational gaffes on the stump.  But Bush’s team has stuck to the plan of illuminating the conservative former Florida governor’s record in the early primary states, and Bush more than any other candidate has cherry-picked supporters and talented staff from the now-defunct Rick Perry and Scott Walker campaigns.
While Rubio is the beneficiary of press attention as the Summer of Trump winds to a close, Bush’s focus on the largely unheralded mechanics of a durable campaign – wooing opinion leaders, building voter files, working on ballot access, conducting effective retail politics in the small venues of Iowa and New Hampshire, touting Bush’s real accomplishments in solid TV ads in early primary states – may be beginning to have the intended effect. Like the nerdy protagonist Mark Watney in The Martian, Bush has decided that in order to win he’s going to have to “science the shit out of this thing” and, starting today, we might be seeing the first glimmers of the success of that approach.
On Sunday morning an NBC/Wall Street Journal poll was released revealing the results of a voter sample taken during the last week of September. While the perception among the chattering class is that Rubio has surged in the past few weeks, the poll numbers tell a different story. According to the poll, Bush increased his vote share in both New Hampshire and Iowa and

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Mike Fasano: Opportunity awaits Richard Corcoran to lead by example

Tuesday, September 15th, 2015

My good friend Speaker-Designate Richard Corcoran is poised to take over the reins of the Florida House of Representatives for the 2016-2018 term.
I’ve known Richard for more than 30 years. A finer public servant would be hard to find. He has the skills, abilities and Tallahassee “know-how” to be an effective leader. He knows how to “get the job done.”
Richard is also a committed family man whose wife and six children are truly his pride and joy. His wife has home-schooled their children, no small feat. The choices he has made in life, with his family at the center of them all, will be important guiding principles that will help structure his speakership.
I applaud him for the family values and more efficient government that he has consistently advocated for many years.
Richard has the opportunity to enact change in Tallahassee that will affect how state government is run for potentially a generation to come. Like his predecessor and early mentor, former speaker and now U.S. Rep Dan Webster, Richard Corcoran will enter his speakership with a plan to completely restructure the way the House operates, literally turning it on its head.
In a time when special interests have far too much control over policy and legislation, Richard’s plan to empower his chamber will return the control of that body to those to whom it belongs: the elected officials and people of Florida.
Although Richard has presented bold and grand ideas to revamp the Florida House to reduce the influence of lobbyists, I have yet to hear his plans regarding how the people of Florida will be served. His constituents back home, and all those across the state who he symbolically represents, need to be part of his plan as well. As noble as his ideas to change the culture of the state Capitol

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Diane Roberts: Absence makes the guv grow fonder

Sunday, August 30th, 2015

To recap: The less-than-Special Session cost the citizens nearly 700 grand, Rick Scott’s legal bills are now north of $1.5 million (not counting the lawsuit environmentalists have filed against the House and Senate for not implementing Amendment 1 or the action Planned Parenthood is likely to bring), the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission has issued more bear hunting permits than there are bears, and there’s a big ole storm aiming for the Gulf of Mexico.
Did I miss anything?
Yikes! Of course I did: In Florida, government dysfunction is the house style.
Legal Barbie, aka Attorney General Pam Bondi, is fighting the EPA’s Clean Power rules.  Because we don’t want the feds interfering in our God-given right to let Big Energy pollute our air.
And you’re paying for yet another demented lawsuit, added to the one siding with polluters of the Chesapeake Bay and the one in which the twice-divorced Bondi crusaded for the sacredness of marriage.
Lottery Secretary Cynthia O’Connell took nearly nine weeks of vacation last year and spent $30,000 traveling on alleged state bidness to Boston, New York and Las Vegas. Because, yeah! What was the question again? While O’Connell rocked the state credit card all over the planet, her division became a seething mess of scandal, with millions in property gone missing, fraud, illicit gun-buying –
On Friday, she resigned to, ahem, “pursue other opportunities in the private sector.”
Over in the legislative branch, the Republicans hate each other. Which makes sense: We hate them, too.
The House and the Senate flounced out of Tallahassee, kicking aside the debris from their latest Big Fail, not the Regular Session hissy-fit pitched when they refused to expand healthcare for poor people (though that was indeed impressive in a nauseating sort of way), but their sad, stupid, inept attempt to redraw Florida’s congressional district map.
An unedifying spectacle,

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Chris Timmons: The GOP needs a new Nixon plan for blacks

Thursday, August 27th, 2015

Let’s circle back to Jeb Bush’s National Urban League address from several weeks ago, because if a big, pointed word must be used, it is “symptomatic” of Republican racial complacency.
(It’s best to exclude Ben Carson, because like all black Republicans from Allen West to Tim Scott, he momentarily forgets that he is black. Colorblindness is infectious, you know.)
Bush told us that after his close loss to Lawton Chiles in the 1994 gubernatorial election he went through one of those “transformations” that recovered his sense of humanity: He converted to Catholicism, he began volunteering at the local Urban League (he cares!), started a local charter school (he seriously cares!).
Establishing that he seriously cares, Bush extrapolated his newfound appreciation of the black underclass to bedrock convictions about what can alleviate black ills: a two-parent family, K-12 school vouchers, and a national economy growing at 4 percent annually.
According to the economists, the last maybe a bit far-fetched. The rest is, underwhelming, to say the least.
But no one would be surprised by this lackluster policy approach toward black woes on the part of a Republican, although one may have had hope for Bush because of his affinity for “big, hairy, audacious” ideas or the realization that he had stumbled in his initial response to the Confederate flag fracas in South Carolina.
Alas, no.
There was no intelligible and substantive policy because Bush is still using the Ronald Reagan mode of engagement with blacks.
Not necessarily, a “welfare queens”  stance but a sly perversion of the late academic and U.S. Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s  too frequently trotted out point that the problems of black life are embedded in a pathological and cultural misanthropy. Wrong!
Hence the need for a “two-parent” family, according to Bush.
Beside the point!
Once upon a time, Republicans were better than this. Nearly inexplicably, that once upon

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