Posts Tagged ‘U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’

With help from investor-Gov. Scott, Sabal Trail natural gas pipeline looks to open in June

Thursday, March 23rd, 2017

By Joseph A. Mann Jr.
FloridaBulldog.org
The Sabal Trail natural gas pipeline, a giant interstate project whose tail reaches over 268 miles into Florida, has generated fierce opposition as its construction moves through the state from Georgia to its end-point in Osceola County, where it is scheduled to link up to an existing gas pipeline in June.
The post With help from investor-Gov. Scott, Sabal Trail natural gas pipeline looks to open in June appeared first on Florida Bulldog.

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Official sides with Georgia over Florida in water lawsuit

Tuesday, February 14th, 2017

A judicial official sided with Georgia in a decades-long dispute over water rights with Florida on Tuesday, recommending that the U.S. Supreme Court refuse Florida’s high-stakes request to cap water use by its neighboring state.
The dispute focuses on the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin, covering nearly 20,000 square miles in western Georgia, eastern Alabama and the Florida Panhandle. The Chattahoochee and Flint rivers meet at the Georgia-Florida border to form the Apalachicola, which flows into the bay and the Gulf of Mexico beyond.
The recommendation from Special Master Ralph Lancaster, who was appointed by the court to oversee Florida’s suit against Georgia, isn’t a final decision. The court’s review of Lancaster’s report and responses from each state could take months. The states’ battle over water use dates back to 1990, and includes drawn-out negotiations and several lawsuits.
The initial decision was a big blow for Florida Gov. Rick Scott, who had decided to take Florida’s case directly to the U.S. Supreme Court and announced the lawsuit in the town of Apalachicola with great fanfare. Jackie Schutz, a spokeswoman for Scott, said the governor’s office was reviewing the report by the special master but did not offer any comments beyond that.
In the past few weeks Scott has been forced to defend the lawsuit because the state’s legal fees in the complicated case have been rapidly mounting. The state has spent more than $41 million in the past 18 months alone, an amount that Republicans in charge of the Florida House say is too much.
Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal said he was “incredibly pleased” by Lancaster’s conclusion.
“Georgia remains committed to the conservation efforts that make us amicable stewards of our water,” he said in a statement. “We are encouraged by this outcome which puts us closer to finding a resolution to a decades-long dispute over the use

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Water experts urge Tallahassee, Washington to ‘finish the job’ on Florida water quality, quantity

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

Five dozen water quality experts have sent a letter to urge Gov. Rick Scott, as well as state and federal governments, to finish the job on Florida water that began more than 15 years ago.
The letter Tuesday morning, signed by 60 Florida water policy experts, went to Scott, Senate President Joe Negron and House Speaker Richard Corcoran. It calls on lawmakers at both the state and federal levels to come to a “thoughtful, comprehensive solution” in fixing issues with the state’s water quality and quantity.
“Water is Florida’s most precious resource and the state’s largest freshwater system — which spans from Lake Okeechobee to the Everglades — deserves a thoughtful, comprehensive solution in addressing water quality and quantity issues,” the letter says. “This solution has already been developed with input from some of the most knowledgeable scientists, engineers, and water quality experts in the world.”
Delivering the message was Henry Dean, former executive director of both the South Florida and St. Johns River Water Management Districts. Dean ran the St. Johns water district for 17 years until 2001, when then-Gov. Jeb Bush asked him to take over the South Florida water district. Dean then led SWFMD until stepping down in 2005.
Water experts and scientists from across the state want Tallahassee and Capitol Hill to come together to finish work agreed upon in 2000 under the umbrella of the Integrated Delivery Schedule — suite of state and federal water restoration projects for wetlands throughout Florida.
The signers are recommending the completion of authorized IDS projects, which include the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP), first enacted by Congress in 2000; the Central Everglades Planning Project (CEPP), a series of ecosystem projects by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; and repairs to the Herbert Hoover Dike surrounding Lake Okeechobee.
These plans are each codified in the IDS, adding

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Go-ahead given for deepening Port Everglades

Friday, December 23rd, 2016

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has been given the green light to move forward with a plan to deepen and widen Port Everglades.
Port officials said Thursday that the corps can move ahead with the project now that President Obama signed into the law last week the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act.
The project will deepen the port’s navigational channel to 48 feet from 42 feet and widen the entrance so that cargo ships can get past docked cruise ships.
The plan also calls for planting 103,000 new nursery-raised coral in 18 acres of existing reef areas and creating five acres of artificial reef by relocating around 11,500 corals.
Republished with permission of the Associated Press.
The post Go-ahead given for deepening Port Everglades appeared first on Florida Politics.

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Florida Chamber to buttonhole state’s congressional delegation

Monday, November 14th, 2016

A delegation from the Florida Chamber of Commerce is headed to Washington this week to press the state’s congressional delegation on pro-business policies.
Bob Grammig, the Holland & Knight partner who is the Chamber’s chairman-elect, will lead the “Fly-In” delegation.
Also attending are Lee Sandler, of the Sandler, Travis & Rosenberg law firm; Eric Silagy, Florida Power & Light Co.’s president and CEO; Alice Ancona, the Chamber’s director for global outreach; executive vice president David Hart; global outreach manager Dan Tapia; and Frank Walker, vice president for governmental affairs.
They’ll meet with Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Mario Diaz-Balart, Vern Buchanan, Bill Nelson, Marco Rubio, and Dave Reichert of Washington state, chairman of the House Ways and Means trade subcommittee.
The group will be there from Tuesday through Thursday.
Their targets include a Labor Department regulation extending overtime pay to some 4 million white-collar workers. And they will press for infrastructure spending including a bill authorizing 25 critical U.S. Army Corps of Engineers projects.
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Storm wipes out Florida sand crucial for protection, tourism

Monday, October 10th, 2016

When Christa Savva returned to the Sandy Shoes Beach Resort a day after Hurricane Matthew brushed by Melbourne Beach, Florida, she looked at the beach in front of the pink-flamingo-colored hotel and noticed that half the sand dunes had disappeared.
Savva guesses three-quarters of the missing dunes washed into the ocean, and the remaining quarter scattered onto the resort’s beachfront property, which was undamaged by the hurricane.
“I was like, ‘Oh, my goodness!’” Savva, a property manager for the Space-Age-era hotel, said Sunday. “It’s crazy to have the dunes gone and all you see is empty space.”
The sand on Florida’s beaches is the equivalent of tourism gold, and its disappearance over time threatens the state’s No. 1 industry. While Hurricane Matthew didn’t ravage Florida’s coast as a series of storms did a dozen years ago, it collapsed dunes, washing away sand that protected buildings and roads during storms, and will likely require the spending of millions of dollars on beach restoration projects.
In Jacksonville Beach, the top of the dunes collapsed onto the lower part of the dunes, creating 10-foot high cliffs of sand, rather than the usual gentle slopes of the dunes.
Federal, state and local officials respond to beach erosion by depositing new sand in areas where it has disappeared, and the sand dunes act as barriers to infrastructure. Before these projects took off three decades ago, sea walls were often the only thing that stood between water, winds and buildings during storms.
“The good news is a lot of people don’t realize our beaches are engineered. It looks natural, but we construct the sand so it’s sacrificed during hurricanes and protects roads and structures and potentially human lives,” said Jackie Keiser, a Jacksonville-area official with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.
While a statewide evaluation of beach erosion has yet to be completed,

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Jack Nicklaus, partners pay $400K to settle charges they filled wetlands at golf club

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

By Francisco Alvarado
FloridaBulldog.org
Golf legend Jack Nicklaus has given up a legal battle over federal accusations that his companies violated the Clean Water Act by disturbing environmentally protected wetlands in The Bear’s Club, a private golf course community he built 17 years ago.
The post Jack Nicklaus, partners pay $400K to settle charges they filled wetlands at golf club appeared first on Florida Bulldog.

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All Aboard Florida’s plan for passenger train service from Miami to Orlando in jeopardy

Saturday, September 10th, 2016

By Ann Henson Feltgen
FloridaBulldog.org
All Aboard Florida’s plan to operate regular passenger train service between Miami and Orlando is in jeopardy following a federal judge’s order questioning the company’s ability to borrow $1.75 billion in taxpayer-subsidized federal bonds to pay for the project.
The post All Aboard Florida’s plan for passenger train service from Miami to Orlando in jeopardy appeared first on Florida Bulldog.

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All Aboard Florida’s plan for passenger train service from Miami to Orlando in jeopardy

Saturday, September 10th, 2016

By Ann Henson Feltgen
FloridaBulldog.org
All Aboard Florida’s plan to operate regular passenger train service between Miami and Orlando is in jeopardy following a federal judge’s order questioning the company’s ability to borrow $1.75 billion in taxpayer-subsidized federal bonds to pay for the project.
The post All Aboard Florida’s plan for passenger train service from Miami to Orlando in jeopardy appeared first on Florida Bulldog.

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